Skip to main content
5 answers
5
Asked 410 views

How to approach writing a report for a task?

Hello,

One of the tasks that I'm working on as an intern requires me to write a report on my learnings and findings.

What might be the best way to approach this?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

5

5 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

Kate,

I don't have any personal experience on this, but, since you have no answers yet, I'm going to give it a shot.

I think first I would reacquaint myself with the vision and mission statements of the company or organization. I would also look at the "paperwork" establishing the Internship - what were the objectives and expected outcomes? Whatever I wrote, it would be done with these things in mind, trying to mesh my experience with the organization and the internship itself.

How to get started? Everyone is different. Me? I'd sort of clear my mind, relax, and casually scroll through the e-mails/text messages associated with my time in the position. Let it all rattle around in my head for a little while, without trying to make anything of it. Eventually I'd start jotting down random ideas. This might include notes on what I learned from different staff members, informal observations about how the team works together, complementing each other, things like that. At some point I'd totally clear it from my mind, take the dog for a walk, and all of a sudden, it would start to come together in my mind all on its own. This usually occurs when I have no paper or electronic device with me.

Back to the serious stuff. Nobody likes reading lengthy papers. So, keep it short. Find ways to convey the same ideas but in fewer words. Proofread. Spellcheck. Have another human who will be brutally honest with you review it for content, clarity, and errors. Make SURE you figure out who you are to submit it to and if you are to "cc" anyone. Don't want any bruised feelings!

I don't understand the difference between "learnings" and "findings" - was it a research project?

Anyway, hope this is helpful! Keep it professional - no casual lingo please, no jargon, shorthand, etc.

Kim
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Nicole Ashley’s Answer

Kate-

As working as a news media and broadcaster ! Anytime your given a topic to write about think about it. What do we spend most of our days looking at ? The internet ! Google it ? Start asking questions to the search indicator as you would for the topic at hand. You will get all types of insight.
Now, granted some useful, some not so much okay . But; By the time your done, you will know almost everything you need to know about the subject at hand that writing about it will just come rolling off your mind to the tip of your pen( bad analogy, I know lol ) ……
Never doubt yourself though. You will always be one step ahead of the next person if you just beleive in yourself !!
-I always like to Include these statements

• no question is a dumb question
• It’s ok if you don’t know……. If you knew it all we wouldn’t need education
• if you get overwhelmed: step back and take five
• always remember - without failure there is no success: I know a bit cliche’ ..but it’s true

Nicole Ashley recommends the following next steps:

I’m a list taker - get a journal
Write the questions you think you would need to ask
Research the topic from every aspect
Always spellcheck and grammar - that is paid more attention to than you think
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Amanda’s Answer

Hey there!
Your report should have the following sections.
-Executive summary (no more than one page that overviews the report. It should be written last)
-overview of what happened, what you did. Just the facts.
-analysis of what happened / what you did
-any costs
-results of what you learned
-recommendations for improvements
-closing summary (one or two paragraphs)
-any appendices

Use charts and graphs to really punch home the story you are telling. Make sure to caption each chart as "figure one", "figure two" , etc., as you go, and include a short title for what the chart is. Make sure the formatting of the charts is all the same. If you outline one chart, all should be outlined. If you use gridlines in one chart, all should have gridlines etc.

Good luck!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Samantha’s Answer

Hi Kate,

I’d recommend trying to see if you can find any examples of reports written by others at your company. While the topic and format of your report may be a little different from other reports written at the company, they may serve as a good example of the way reports are generally formatted and what sections your May want to add to your report that you hadn’t already considered. I would also try researching reports on similar topics and using their formats as a guide to help you prepare your report. Most importantly, make sure to keep your report organized and break it into different sections to keep each distinct topic separate. Best of luck and don’t be afraid to ask your a manager if he/she is happy with the format of the report you have decided on before you complete the report. Getting feedback while you are still working on a project or report is always helpful.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Wanda’s Answer

I don’t have much experience on this, but what comes to mind, is researching the topics that you intern and getting as much information and data about the topic then adding that into your personal experience. Hope this helps.
0