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How did being fluent in two languages affect your career?

I am currently enrolled in a Spanish immersion program, and am going to graduate high school with a minor in Spanish. How did a similar opportunity help your career plans?

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Nina’s Answer

I agree with Faizal's answer. It really depends on your interest but another language will ALWAYS give you an edge. I'm a native Spanish speaker (from El Salvador), and I also majored in Spanish in college because I came here at 13 yo. I entered marketing early in my career and speaking Spanish allowed me to do Hispanic market in the U.S. I'm now in the area of Corporate Social Responsibility and Spanish helps because we have operations in Mexico. So whenever we need assistance with our Mexico market, I'm called upon to help.
Try to identify the area of business/government that you think you'd enjoy and then research deeper on what opportunities require a second language like Spanish. I know people that chose diplomacy and Spanish is very helpful.
Reach out if you'd like more advice.
Nina

Nina recommends the following next steps:

Explore areas of career interest and then research how your second language maybe helpful.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate your support, Nina Nathan
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Lucy’s Answer

My experience is a bit less direct - I haven’t done a ton of work translating or speaking my other languages in the workplace, but speaking those languages got me my first foothold in my career. Specifically, in college I studied abroad in Brazil, and as I was fluent in Portuguese, I was offered an internship at a local TV production company over some peers that did not speak Portuguese as well. Putting in my time and working hard on that internship helped me get another opportunity for the following Summer at a TV production company in London. After college I pivoted into business - but I guarantee my two international work experiences helped me land my first job at a global research and advisory company, working with clients all over the world. I did do some minor client translations there, but that was certainly not my job. I got to travel the world and spend time in Australia and the UK with that company- a fun time! So my advice is keep up with your language learning and use your fluency as an advantage where you can, getting jobs or internships you want. But, if you don’t want to spend your career translating or teaching your language, don’t feel limited to those kinds of jobs or roles either.
Thank you comment icon Loved reading this, thanks! Nathan
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Faizal’s Answer

- It depends on the career choices you want to pursue . (Focusing the answer on Spanish) A couple of examples that we know of are as Teachers of the second language, leading customer service in the specific language (Spanish in your case), Working for say US Department of State (embassy), helping companies develop the Spanish version of the app etc.
- Shows well on your resume as having knowledge of multiple languages tells that you go the extra mile to learn new things.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Faizal! Nathan
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