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Deciding on a career

How do I decide which career to start with if I have multiple interests?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Franklin’s Answer

Pick the one that will make you happiest and don't be afraid to pivot. Often times people don't know which career will be meaningful to them until they try it. It's common for people to change careers as well.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Franklin. Sarah
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Wendy’s Answer

Great question and super impressive that you have that awareness! Time permitting try to get some exposure either through online experience, summer jobs, after school internships, talk to people about what they do. A few great conversation starters when speaking with someone whose career path is interesting is to ask - what was your first job? How did you get started?

Some jobs are more social than others and I have found that it's important to understand "you" and what your strengths are and that will help narrow down.

Looks to build skills that are transferable, making it easy to move industries. The first 2 years of college are normally liberal arts, and provide time to evaluate interests.
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Jordie’s Answer

If you are still a student, get some experience in different fields by doing internships! They are a great way to potentially earn college credit while determining if that field would be a good fit for you. You could also set up some informational interviews with people in jobs you might have interest in. Ask for a half hour-hour of their time and come prepared with questions (google will help you formulate these). Speak with professors about how they got to where they are now and what drew them to that path. Of course, anytime you are asking to meet with someone, make sure to confirm a day or so before and arrive on time.

Also, just because you choose one career path, doesn't mean you can't change your mind later on. Might require some school/courses or taking a pay cut for a short time but what makes you happiest at one point in life, may not always be the same later on in life (and that's okay!!).
Thank you comment icon I appreciate your support, Jordie Sarah
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Vamshee’s Answer

one has to ask these questions while choosing the career.
Successful career is all about job Growth, Opportunities, Salary, Satisfaction.
For each of your interest, compare them how each one stands in relation to growth, opportunities, Salary and Satisfaction
My son was interested in photography when he was in his high school, I told him that he can pursue it as a hobby or second job but working in STEM would bring in more opportunities, better paying jobs with long career.I had asked him to talk to professional in different careers to get some idea and see what interests him most.
He found his interest in Graphics Information Technology and pursuing his undergrad right now.
Talk to someone who works in particular profession to know pros and cons, so you get an idea about it and helps you compare and guide you in deciding which career to choose.
Also, it's easy to switch careers in initial few years of a Carrer, so you can try out one and see what it brings.

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Nicholas’s Answer

I agree with Franklin's answer. You aren't going to truly know what you want to do until you get some relevant experience doing the job. While that can seem intimidating with lots of options, try to research the industries or type of work you are considering to get a better feel for what your job choices do or who they work with. Moving jobs is also extremely common these days and there are opportunities everywhere. I would also recommend, when you are trying out a job or getting one for the first time, to work hard and learn as much as you can. This will help you make more informed decisions relating to career options.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Sarah
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Jimil’s Answer

Frankly, I think you should pick a career that makes a very good salary. I know this sounds cliche, but many jobs pay 50-70k a year, which is not enough to raise a family in california, hawaii, and many other parts of the united states. Jobs that require graduate school like law or medical are good careers, as well as engineering and science. Business degrees are a dime a dozen, and everyone has one, so it does not set you apart from the competition when it comes to applying for jobs. The sooner you can find something you are passionate about that also makes money, the sooner you can start building your resume so you can actually attain one of these jobs. I recommend looking on linkedin for the actual job postings out there, so you know what you need in order to attain certain positions. Furthermore, try to talk to someone that has worked one of these positions so you can better understand what they actually do on a day to day basis. A lot of job descriptions use professional language that just sounds confusing, when in reality 90% of white collar jobs involve answering the phone or making phone calls. Believe it or not, many companies still use cold calling, where you just sit and call 60 people a day hoping to make a sale. Antiquated marketing methods such as these tend to pay less, whereas SEO and other careers relating to these disciplines pay more, because they use technology and they make you irreplaceable because you are doing something nobody else can do. Soft skills are a dime a dozen. Meaning everyone can talk on the phone, communicate with customers or teams, and have a conversation. Understanding and getting experience using certain programs make you irreplaceable and pay much more. I chose to do software engineering because it pays way more than phone related jobs, the jobs are more plentiful, faster to acquire, and this case your income is not predicated upon someone else doing what you ask them to do. Try a few different jobs, and you will find out what you like and what you don't.

Deciding on a career can be a difficult task, especially if you have multiple interests. Here are a few steps you can take to help you narrow down your options:

Research: Research different careers that align with your interests. Look into the day-to-day responsibilities, necessary skills and qualifications, salary, and job outlook for each career you're interested in. This will give you a better idea of which careers may be a good fit for you.

Assess your strengths and values: Consider your strengths and values, and think about how they align with the different careers you're interested in. For example, if you value creativity, you may want to pursue a career in the arts, while if you value stability, you may want to pursue a career in a more established field.

Gather feedback: Talk to people who are working in the fields you're interested in, and ask for their perspective on what the job is like. This will give you a sense of what you can expect on a day-to-day basis and will help you make a more informed decision.

Try it out: Take the time to gain experience through internships, volunteer work or temporary jobs, this will help you to understand the work environment and help you to validate your interest in a field.

Reflect: Take some time to reflect on your decision and think about what you want to achieve in your career. Write down your goals, and think about how the different careers you're interested in can help you achieve them.

It's important to keep in mind that your career choice may not be set in stone, and you may change your mind over time. The most important thing is to take the time to research and explore different options, and to choose a career that aligns with your interests, strengths, and values. Remember that you can always reevaluate and make changes in the future if needed.
Thank you comment icon This is a very robust answer but I do want to point out that soft skills are still very important and will get you much further than those who do not possess them. There are many people out there who do not know how to communicate in professional settings or have a debilitating fear of public speaking. Not to say that soft skills are the most important thing when hiring but they ARE important. Ex: I'd hire an SEO specialist that can also talk to clients over someone who cannot. Gurpreet Lally, Admin
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Elias’s Answer

Apply for roles for each interest and take the first one that lands on your feet. That's usually the best sign.
Thank you comment icon Elias, thank you! Sarah
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