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How can I figure out what I want to do in mcoklege majors? ?

How do I figure out what to do for my college majors?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Bhavna’s Answer

1. Research information about different college majors. Learn about the different areas of study, career paths related to each major, and the job opportunities available with each one.

2. Talk to people to gain insight into what they like and don’t like about their major and profession. Speak to family, friends, teachers, and professionals in the field.

3. Take career assessment tests. Use online tools and assessment center tests to better understand your own skills and interests, and how they relate to various majors and professions.

4. See what majors are offered at different colleges and universities around the country. Consider the tuition, location, and characteristics of the schools, as these factors may influence your major decision.

5. Review information from your college advisors. Visit the college or university’s advisors to get help narrowing down your choices and recommendations for class schedules and resources that can help you as you pursue your major.

6. Reach out to the college’s alumni or career and placement centers. Ask alumni about their experiences with the major and for advice about selecting a major and job opportunities. Talk to career counselors about potential career paths based on your interests.

7. Follow your passions. Think about what you’re passionate and curious about, and strive to pursue a major that will allow you to explore those interests.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Chaniya,

To figure out what to do for your college major, follow these steps:

Self-Assessment: Begin by evaluating your interests, skills, and values. Take personality tests, career assessments, and explore your hobbies to understand what truly motivates and excites you. Some popular resources for self-assessment include the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), Strong Interest Inventory, and the Holland Code System.

Research Careers: Look into various careers that align with your interests and skills. Use resources like the Occupational Outlook Handbook by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, career exploration websites, and speak with professionals in fields that interest you. This will help you understand the requirements, responsibilities, and potential job growth for different career paths.

Explore College Majors: Once you have a better understanding of potential careers, research the college majors that lead to those fields. Visit college websites, consult with academic advisors, and read about various majors to learn about their coursework, requirements, and potential career outcomes.

Network and Seek Mentorship: Connect with professionals, alumni, and current students in the fields that interest you. Attend career fairs, join clubs, and participate in internships to gain insights into various industries and career paths. Mentors can provide valuable advice and guidance on choosing a major and navigating your college experience.

Consider Your Future Goals: Reflect on your long-term aspirations, such as graduate school, specific careers, or personal goals. Ensure that your chosen major aligns with these objectives and provides a solid foundation for your future endeavors.

Be Open to Change: As you progress through college, your interests and goals may evolve. Be open to adjusting your major if needed, and don’t be afraid to explore new opportunities. Many students change their majors at least once during their college journey.

Utilize College Resources: Take advantage of the resources available at your college or university, such as career centers, academic advisors, and counseling services. These professionals can help you make informed decisions about your major and provide guidance throughout your college experience.

Remember, choosing a college major is a personal decision, and there is no one-size-fits-all answer. Take your time, be patient, and make informed choices based on your interests, skills, and long-term goals.

GOD BLESS,
James.
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Arantza’s Answer

In addition to what Bhavna suggested. I would look through job descriptions and job postings.
Look at the jobs that are trending and in high demand.
Pay attention to the requirements.
Compare the compensation ranges (benefits and salary).

That should help you have a goal in mind and figure out the steps to get there including your major.
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Dan’s Answer

Hi Chaniya- I would suggest before choosing a major, that you try and get a clear sense of what career pathway(s) you are interested in pursuing. Find out more about the subjects/activities that are satisfying and motivating to you. Interest inventories, personality assessments etc. can be helpful in your decision making. It is very important, before going off to school to have at least a fairly good idea of what career direction seems best suited for you, College can be an expensive proposition, especially if your fuzzy on your career direction . I went off to college having no real clue of what I wanted to do for a career. So I ended up randomly choosing (in my immature, unwise 17 year old mindset) a major in sociology, as I had I vague idea I wanted to "work with people" . If I was honest with myself, I chose that major because I thought it would be easy and not too demanding. I really enjoyed studying foreign languages and kick myself even today, for not majoring in French (which I loved) but at the time seemed too demanding, requiring too much work and thus, decided to take the easy way out. Big mistake ! If you are not real clear on your career direction, taking some time off from school to work for awhile and experience/learn some new things might be a big help to you, Also, you may be thinking much differently about your career direction in your early twenties then you would at 17 or 18. My daughter(who wasn't sure what she wanted to do career wise) didn't start college until she was 21. and was very pleased about that decision and saw much wisdom in waiting, some of which was simply having an increased level of maturity. Talk over your concerns with parents, counselors and friends, which may help to better clarify the right direction for you, Sometimes(especially parents) others know us better than we know ourselves. All the best in your future decisions and in whatever endeavors you choose to pursue.
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