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Mechanical engineering job

What job did a mechanical engineering degree get and how did you get the job?

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Muhammad’s Answer

My degree was from Scotland, and being new to the United States was a bit of a struggle, but just sheer volume of applications landed me the job, apply for anything and everything just to get in front of recruiters, if you can afford I would recommend getting LinkedIn premium and send in mails to recruiters who have posted a position you like.

I started off as a Mechanical Design engineer with GE power and water after that I started working in systems engineering and then systems safety and reliability in transit industry (predominantly electrical/software and statistical analysis) then moved into urban air mobility (air Ubers) and space industry doing system safety and reliability.

My advice would be to use the degree in any discipline to facilitate entry into the industry then it’s up to you to take initiative and explore, don’t confine yourself to what your degree is you might enjoy something else!!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Muhammad. stella
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Yhtiyar’s Answer

A mechanical engineering degree can lead to a wide variety of job opportunities in fields such as automotive, aerospace, manufacturing, energy, and more. Some common job titles for mechanical engineers include design engineer, manufacturing engineer, project engineer, research and development engineer, and quality control engineer.

As an AI language model, I don't have personal experiences, but generally, getting a job in mechanical engineering typically involves a combination of education, skills, and experience. Having a degree in mechanical engineering is a great starting point, but it's important to also gain practical experience through internships or co-op programs during your studies. Networking with professionals in the field, attending job fairs, and participating in extracurricular activities can also help you land a job after graduation.

Once you have identified potential job openings, make sure you tailor your application to each specific job and company. Highlight your relevant skills and experience, and be sure to provide examples of how you have used them in past projects or experiences. Lastly, make sure to prepare well for interviews by researching the company and practicing your responses to common interview questions.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for giving me advice. stella
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Glenn’s Answer

I had a tough start when I graduated. The market was down and I actually got laid off before I started my first job. I have had a great career doing product development as a mechanical engineer and now I am a hiring manager for an ME team.

You have to be prepared for the job search. Starts with doing projects, and learning the fundamentals in school. Definitely try to Coop or intern. When you are ready to interview, prepare. Practice interviewing and learn about the company and read the job description in detail. When you interview, relax and be yourself. Listen to the questions and answer them in detail. Apply for a lot of positions, don't be too selective. Most importantly is that you get a job, there are not a lot of perfect jobs. Better that you get experience.

Glenn recommends the following next steps:

Study and learn fundamentals
Coop or intern
Apply for a lot of positions
Prepare for the interviews by learning about the company and know what they are looking for. Don't forget to practice for the interview
Relax and be yourself. Listen and answer the questions asked in detail
Thank you comment icon Thanks, can't wait to put this advice into action! stella
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Tricia’s Answer

I have had several job titles:
Maintenance engineer
Reliability engineer
Process engineer
Engineering manager (project engineer)

My first job I got from a college career fair. My summer internships through the university definitely helped.

After that, I have found jobs via LinkedIn or Indeed.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! stella
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Melvin’s Answer

Though some folks have given great answers, I'd like to agree with and add to what was said. I'd like to emphasize doing projects related to the kind of jobs you think would be interesting to you. They'll not only help you stand out from the crowd and secure internship, co-op, and research opportunities, but they'll also help you gain a confident understanding of what's required of your work and a greater appreciation for what you want to do as well as demonstrate that you have what it takes to persevere. If you struggle to find opportunities, try to MAKE your own opportunities by doing your own projects (there's so many different projects you can search online as reference), including other people as needed, and learn as much as you can about the ins-and-outs of what makes things work. With that, you can at least have a stepping stone when you approach a professor in school with a similar research interest or when you do an interview for an internship or co-op.

Melvin recommends the following next steps:

Get involved with projects to stand out.
If you struggle to find opportunities, MAKE your own opportunity!
Thank you comment icon I appreciate your support, Melvin stella
Thank you comment icon No problem Stella! Hope you go far! Melvin Summerville
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Pascal’s Answer

I got my degree in France.
As part of the graduation requirements I had to do an internship, which I did as a right-hand or helper for a senior engineer in a national company that deals with nuclear power plants.
It was about brainstorming, problem solving, coming up with prototypes, and mostly designing and fabricating (procurement and assembly) of small test benches for gaskets and other large plumbing equipment.
After I graduated I was hired by the same group to continue some similar work: that was my first job! for three years.
So it has been quite easy.
From there one jumps from one job or company to another depending of either the randomness of things or a clear drive and project for your future.
Maybe you want to pick your first ME job in a field or products that you like and are familiar with. For example if you like bikes, maybe find a bike or bike components company.
By age 20 I had already swapped engines in several cars and motor cycles, I was handy with tools and in a workshop: I recommend to build this kind of experience if you want to be an ME. Doesn't have to be cars, it can be toasters or smartphones, although it is better to be something you can really tinker with.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for sharing your perspective. stella
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Stella!

Just thought I'd share with you that a degree in mechanical engineering can open doors to a multitude of career paths in various sectors. Here's a quick rundown of some of the common roles you might come across:

1. Mechanical Engineer: These professionals design, develop, test, and produce mechanical devices, tools, and machines. You'll find them in industries like automotive, aerospace, energy, manufacturing, and more.

2. Project Engineer: They're the ones who manage engineering projects from beginning to end, keeping an eye on budgets, schedules, and resources while ensuring that the project aligns with all technical specifications and requirements.

3. Manufacturing Engineer: These engineers work on enhancing the efficiency of manufacturing processes. Their goal is to optimize production methods, cut costs, and ensure the quality of the end product.

4. Automotive Engineer: They're the brains behind designing and developing systems and components for vehicles. They might work on engine design, aerodynamics, safety features, or electrical systems within cars.

5. Aerospace Engineer: These engineers design and develop aircraft, spacecraft, satellites, and missiles. They focus on areas like aerodynamics, propulsion systems, materials selection, and structural design.

6. Consulting Engineer: They provide expert advice to businesses or government agencies on various engineering projects, working across different industries.

7. Research and Development (R&D) Engineer: Their job involves creating new products or improving existing ones through research and testing, often working in labs or research facilities.

8. Energy Engineer: These engineers work on developing sustainable energy solutions like solar power, wind power, or energy-efficient systems for buildings and industrial facilities.

9. HVAC Engineer: HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) engineers design systems for controlling indoor environments in buildings, focusing on climate control and air quality.

10. Biomedical Engineer: These engineers use engineering principles in the field of medicine, designing medical devices, artificial organs, or healthcare technology.

After earning a mechanical engineering degree, here are some steps to land a job in these roles:

- Networking: Building connections within the industry can help you learn about job opportunities and gain insights into specific companies or roles.
- Internships/Co-op Programs: Practical experience gained during college through internships or co-op programs can lead to full-time job offers after graduation.
- Job Applications: Applying for entry-level positions through online job portals, company websites, or recruitment agencies is a common first step.
- Further Education/Certifications: Some people pursue advanced degrees or certifications to specialize in specific areas of mechanical engineering or to enhance their qualifications.
- Professional Development: Staying updated with the latest trends and technologies through workshops, seminars, or industry certifications is crucial.

Here are the top 3 authoritative reference publications in the field:

1. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) - www.asme.org
2. National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) - www.nspe.org
3. Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE International) - www.sae.org

Wishing you all the best and may you be blessed abundantly!
James.
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