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Careers that involve STEM and Writing?

I'm really drawn to STEM (especially math) and writing. Are there any careers (other than finance and accounting) that combine my two interests?

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Aravind’s Answer

Hi Genevieve

STEM is a huge ocean of areas and the combination of knowledge in STEM areas with excellent writing and communication skills will definitely take you a long way

There are various roles today that require a combination of technical knowledge and writing skills - technical writer, scientific editors to name a few that are global in nature and open up a huge array of opportunities

Within specific industry sectors themselves- combination of technical skills and excellent written communication will definitely set you up for success. Explaining technical concepts in a simple language succinctly , writing business cases, proposals , executive reports- all these are part of the day to day job responsibilities in any industry

Here's wishing you all the best in your career
Thank you comment icon Thank you!! Genevieve
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Kimberly’s Answer

STEM is a great field that has many, many careers. For someone who is interested in writing within the STEM field medical writing maybe an area to look. Usually, Medical Writers are utilized in clinical research. Please do some research on medical writing this maybe a path you will enjoy. And keep in mind that whatever career route you choose is not something that has to be done the rest of your life. There is a huge world out here explore explore explore!
Best Wishes.
Thank you comment icon Thanks Kimberly! Genevieve
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Rodolfo Elias’s Answer

Most STEM careers will require a solid ability to write. The folks that move up in STEM to leadership must have excellent communication skills to sell themselves and their products.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Genevieve
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david’s Answer

Hi, Genevieve ,
When you think of STEM, think of collaboration, integration, project involvement, critical thinking, and problem-solving. STEM is the emphasis to bring parts of each into the whole. Career opportunities with STEM are vast, whether in electronics, engineering, any of the sciences, including teaching. In all of those, excellent written skills are vital to ensure reaching the desired level of communication. So, from that, your choices are whatever interests you. Aim high. You'll do well. All the best to you.
Thank you comment icon Thanks David!!! Genevieve
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Benjamin’s Answer

The math part is easy, as most jobs in STEM require a good understanding of mathematics. Jobs like Mechanical and Civil Engineering probably require the most actual calculations since there is a lot of mechanical physics involved in both. Being fortunate enough to like doing the math itself will make a lot of your physics classes easier if you go to university. Jobs in Software and Computer Engineering requires more theoretical math and statistics, though there is sometimes calculation involved. As a software developer, learning how to do proofs have allowed me to better assess my code.

Writing is an often overlooked aspect of most tech jobs. As a software developer, I spend a good portion of my time writing. When you are leading almost a project, the first step is generally writing some sort of design doc that weighs the pros and cons of any solution you propose. If you are interested in more creative or persuasive writing, a tech journalist or Software Developer Manager involves more writing and rewards those who have a deeper understanding of tech.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Genevieve
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Gennie A’s Answer

There are lots of careers that involve that! Every company has finance, every industry has finance, money does make the world go around. Find out what interests you, what types of books interest you most, articles you have read or podcasts you have listened too more than any other and then find a company that works in that field. See if they have internships so you can learn more about that field, dig in and find your passion and then find the job that will help you build a career on that passion.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice Gennie! Genevieve
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Vern’s Answer

BLUF(1): writing is every bit as important in STEM as math, science, engineering and math.

Almost all STEM degrees need people with strong communication skills including writing, graphics, and speaking. Typical writing tasks include: 1) preparing proposals; 2) writing specification writing; 3) writing process and procedure instructions; 4) writing technical papers for journals; and 5) preparing business plans and business case analysis'. Many if not most students are surprised when they start college to find out that technical writing is a critical skill to be successful in college and during their career. Technical writing generally more detailed and complex than conventional creative writing. However, organizing and grammar skills used in creative writing translates well to technical writing. Tasks such as preparing proposals also requires a writer to have some story telling ability.
Sometimes STEM writing includes seemingly simple tasks such as answering a straight forward question that is much more complex than the questioner imagined when they pose the question. This requires the writer to be able interpret what other writers say and what they really want (e.g., reading comprehension skills).

(1) BLUF is a military communications acronym—it stands for “bottom line up front”—that's designed to enforce speed and clarity in reports and emails. The basic idea is simple: put the most important details first. Don't tease or delay your main point because people are busy and their time is valuable.
Thank you comment icon Cool! Thanks Vern! Genevieve
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