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What types of jobs would you recommend for an introvert who likes to spend time alone?

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david’s Answer

As a card-carrying introvert myself, I have never known an introvert who preferred being alone, although I'm sure they exist. Instead, whereas extroverts tend to prefer working with people, introverts prefer working with ideas. In 45 years in the computing industry, I can attest that the significant majority were introverts. Introverts like working with things, and that opens the entire window of STEM careers. Whether an engineer, doctor, software developer, electrician, plumber, or scientist, all of these are excellent choices for introverts. Areas where introverts tend to be more challenged are those where they must take initiative with others, such as selling, marketing, politics, and the entertainment industry.
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Diana’s Answer

Great question! From one introvert to another- nice to meet you! Introvert flourish in roles where they can excel within their comfort zone without a ton of physical exposure to the world. I find working remote jobs within Sales, Customer Services, IT, and HR can be very beneficial. Find something that truly speaks to your personality and skill set & you'll do great! Good luck!!
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Michael’s Answer

Absolutely, finding a job that is rewarding for you as an individual is crucial for long term success and job satisfaction. For introverts who enjoy spending time alone, there are many career options that offer the opportunity to work independently and in quiet environments. Some examples include careers in writing, research, data analysis, programming, graphic design, accounting, and library science. These fields typically require focus, attention to detail, and independent work, which are qualities that many introverts possess.

It's also important to consider the industry or field that you want to work in, as well as the company culture and values. Seek out employment that aligns with your personal values and interests, as this will make it easier to find meaning and purpose in your work. You can also seek out assistance from your local department of labor or career services center to explore different career options and receive guidance on finding the right fit for you.
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Max’s Answer

Remote jobs can be an excellent fit for introverts as they minimize the need for office interactions. The only exception might be the occasional weekly calls that are held virtually. There's a wide range of industries and fields to choose from, so you're not limited in your options. You can find these jobs on websites dedicated to remote work or by using the 'remote only' filter on job search sites like Indeed.

If you decide to pursue a remote job, it's important to create a conducive work environment at home. This could involve setting up a dedicated workspace and considering how to establish boundaries with the people you live with. It's also crucial to think about how you'll manage your time and stay motivated. Best of luck on your remote job journey!
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Holli’s Answer

Hi- I am also an introvert, so I acknowledge the challenges that one would have in working in a public sector. Think about what areas are of interest to you. What are some of the things that you passionate about? Since the Corona Virus-19 Pandemic, a lot of companies are offering remote work (allowing their employees the opportunity to work from home), Hybrid (allowing employees to work from home and also spend a day or so in the office collaborating with their co-workers. Hybrid is allowing me the opportunity to interact with co-workers and also work from home two days per week. From my prospective this allow us the best of both worlds. Being around others will stretch you out of your comfort zone.

I wish you the best of luck in your professional journey.
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Mack’s Answer

As a "closet" introvert, I understand the question. Note how all the others who answered consider themselves introverts. Obviously, there are a number of areas in which introverts have been successful.

I will second David's answer that an area dealing with STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) would be a good fit. Most large companies have research and development departments that are home to folks interested in ideas and "things". Manufacturing locations need engineers to deal with equipment and machines and processes. So, if you have a penchant for STEM, consider these areas.

But remember that good ideas and discoveries must be communicated and communication skills can be VERY important in the STEM field.

If STEM is not your game, maybe other vocations that include art or writing would be of interest.

Not to get too deep in the weeds, but one measure of introvert/extrovert is the Myers Briggs Personality Inventory -- while measures suggest that the ratio of introverts to extroverts is about 50/50, the real situation is that this measure is along a scale or spectrum and not a one or the other. That is, most people might be considered some of both. So, use your introvert tendency to reflect, think before acting, pursue in depth one-on-one discussions, observe; use your extrovert tendency, even if minor, to communicate, make decisions, and take actions.
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Shanti’s Answer

I agree with the STEM suggestions but I also want to reinforce the mention of the hybrid or remote working options that are more readily available since we all had to learn to deal with a global pandemic. If you have a good internet connection at home, you can do just about any job that used to require you to go into a office and sit in a cubical! I've also worked with self-proclaimed introverts that were training instructors. They taught online and were able to manage their interactions through the virtual classrooms - so they could just turn it off and walk away and recharge during breaks. I've also known a lot of successful graphic designers and writers and voice-over recording artists who all identify as introverts.

Being an introvert doesn't have to be limiting!
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James’s Answer

I am also an introvert and suffer from PTSD from my time as a combat Marine. I have an excellent job working remotely as an IT consultant and it allows me to be a functional part of society without elevating my stress level.
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Broderick’s Answer

As a person that's always been outgoing and personable with people from all backgrounds, it may seem counter-intuitive for me to maintain 'some' introverted ideals. This, I believe, makes me a source of quality advice in this area. There have been points in my career development that I've not desired any interaction with people, primarily, the public or those positioned to offer evaluations of my performance. In those times I thrived on being entrusted with a task and then given the latitude to use my creativity to curate and cultivate it. As you search inward, analyze those qualities that would allow you to market your independence. These may include a time you were asked to be the principle creative during a school project; or it may include a time where you were looked upon, not for the presentation of the idea, but for the formation of the strategy in which the goal was achieved. To piggyback on Mack's answer, the sky truly is the limit on what pathway is the best, however you must be prepared to overcome any anxiety you may have in sharing your ideas with the decision makers. Take confidence in knowing that being an introvert won't take away from your amazing ability to drive change! And that's the x-factor many companies are seeking! Good luck!
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Rebecca’s Answer

If you like science I think you should consider becoming a researcher. I see lots of introverts in business as well working as business analysts, data scientists, data analysts, and more. That said, you should always try to build a career doing something you love to do.
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Jason’s Answer

The STEM arena is great in general for us introverts. Working with ideas / tech instead of directly with people. Pursuing this type of career also allows you to develop and communicate in the specialized language of your field, which for me at least, tends to make it easier to communicate as we focus more on the task at hand than on personal interaction, which is the kind of personal interaction that appeals to me.
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Anthony’s Answer

IT. Information Technology.
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