Skip to main content
7 answers
7
Asked 185 views Translate

What are good careers paths for introverted people, or how I could go about finding one?

I've never been the best with people but have always wanted to have a career in a science related field.

Thank you comment icon Hello Alayn, That is a great question. Being myself and introvert, I have realized during my career that no matter the path you choose, there are always different ways to perform and be productive regardless of the job you have. However, I would recommend careers such as a translator, physical therapist, technology, researcher, social media manager, writer, paralegal, etc. Bottom line, do something you are passionate about and makes you happy! Gaby P.
+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

7

7 answers


0
Updated Translate

Rebecca’s Answer

I am glad to hear that you are interested in Science. There are many different kinds of science jobs that may not really deal with many people, e.g. working in the lab, do the research in the college, etc. You can find these jobs on the college hiring websites or labs.
Having said that, though these jobs may not require a lot of interaction with many people. It also requires to work with the team. Team work is always essential for all kinds of careers. Do you know the reason why you may not prefer to deal with people? Is it your psychological issue or encounter communication challenge?
You can consider to take some communication class or visit the counselor to seeks some guidance. It can help you for your career development.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
0
0
Updated Translate

Carl’s Answer

I am introverted as well. My suggestion is to find something you are truly passionate about or enjoy and it gets easier. I loved solving problems, in particular math problems, so I studied engineering. While being around lots of people tends to drain me, I found that if I was doing something I had a genuine interest in, it was easier to deal with things that usually wore me out. If the topic at hand is something I am engaged with I am fine but as soon as we move to something outside of my interests it gets a little tougher.

Spend some time really thinking about what is difficult for you to deal with and think about some ways to cope. For example, I had more energy in the afternoons and could deal with people better. I began scheduling meetings with people in the afternoon. Also please remember that while you do have to interact with fellow employees you aren't obligated to do more than is required to get your job done. There is no way to completely avoid being out of your comfort zone but just being cordial and polite can go along way.
0
0
Updated Translate

Sarah’s Answer

Hi there!

Being an introvert myself, I understand your desire to be proactive in searching for a career that you’ll feel comfortable pursuing. I think it’s wonderful that you are considering how specific personality traits fit into different occupations. It demonstrates a thoughtful approach to setting long term goals and that is a great skill to have.

There are many different fields all lumped under the umbrella of “Science.” If you are looking for a possible career in computer science, there a wide variety of occupations that an introverted individual may feel comfortable in. Programming, analytics and data collection/processing are all types of things one can do with relatively minimal interaction with others. You’d be looking for jobs that are project or task oriented.

If you are interested in something more like biological science, I would suggest looking into research or laboratory centered occupations. You might still need to be a part of a small team of individuals but doing so could help you get more comfortable with “people”interaction a little bit at a time. Strengthening one’s ability to communicate with others is almost always a positive, in my opinion.

I hope this helps some. Good luck with your search and keep asking questions!

0
0
Updated Translate

Jen’s Answer

Great question Alayn. Being an introvert myself I completely understand your concern. You may want to target jobs that are behind the scenes initially if that makes you feel more comfortable. For example if working in business perhaps a staff role. You may not feel comfortable being in the forefront at first, but do know that as an introvert you can absolutely do any job. You have to know that certain jobs are extroverted in nature. If you are a leader in the business field for example, you would have to strengthen extroverted type skills to be successful in those roles. Know t hat you can do any job as an introvert, you may just have to learn new skills and flex them at different times while performing a role. Hope this helps! Explore and see what you like. It is natural to feel uncomfortable in the unknown, but that is when you have a chance to grow the most. Good luck!
0
0
Updated Translate

Suzanne’s Answer

Alayn, I think you are asking good questions. Knowing what general areas you are interested in and also understanding your own personality and style are important things to consider as you begin to look toward potential future careers. I had a couple experiences with science-based jobs which would probably be within your comfort range as an introvert. While in college I worked in hospital labs during summer vacations and later, once I had my bachelor's degree in biology, I worked in a medical school's research lab as a technician. Of course, in most jobs there are at least some co-workers and a supervisor, so some people-skills are important....but much of the day in my lab jobs was spent in fairly quiet conditions working more-or-less alone.

Suzanne recommends the following next steps:

Take as many science and math classes as you can to confirm that you enjoy these and to see what you might like to major in.
Contact local hospitals to see if there is a chance to shadow a medical lab technologist. (Also called clinical lab medicine).
See if a college or university near you would let you come visit one of their research labs. Many colleges offer summer science exploration programs for high school students.
Here is an example of a cancer research program for high school students offered by the University of Chicago Medical School which is a paid summer program: https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/cancer/education-outreach/student-education/high-school-undergraduate/researchstart?site=Cancer
Here's a link to the University of Illinois Medical Laboratory Science (medical technology) program: https://www.uis.edu/medicallabscience/
0
0
Updated Translate

Vern’s Answer

In my view the introverted-extroverted continium is of little use in choosing a career. I know of people who are very introverted that are great in professions that most people would consider "extroverted professions." Examples that I'm aware of include introverts who are great teachers, clergy, and actors.

I suspect the introverted-extroverted continium will relate to how an individual approaches the tasks and job functions in their career. For example, an engineering manager that is very introverted may focus their time on developing and managing standard procedures to accomplish functions in the work unit. An extroverted engineering manager may focus their time on interacting with staff and being outfront as a leader. Both functions are important to being successful.

Part of the success in any career is learning how to react to situations in a way that achieves your goals. Sometimes that requires putting aside emotions and preceptions that are counter productive.


0
0
Updated Translate

Vern’s Answer

In my view the introverted-extroverted continium is of little use in choosing a career. I know of people who are very introverted that are great in professions that most people would consider "extroverted professions." Examples that I'm aware of include introverts who are great teachers, clergy, and actors.

I suspect the introverted-extroverted continium will relate to how an individual approaches the tasks and job functions in their career. For example, an engineering manager that is very introverted may focus their time on developing and managing standard procedures to accomplish functions in the work unit. An extroverted engineering manager may focus their time on interacting with staff and being outfront as a leader. Both functions are important to being successful.

Part of the success in any career is learning how to react to situations in a way that achieves your goals. Sometimes that requires putting aside emotions and preceptions that are counter productive.


0