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Questions about Security Guard position?

1. Will I have on-the-job training for the Security Gaurd position, or would I have to take a class/classes and will those be provided or not?

2. What will my schedule look like while being a Security Guard, and will my schedule remain the same or will it shift from time to time?

3. When will I start, what kinds of tools and gear will I be given when I start my Security Guard Position?

Thank you comment icon Hey Salvador, these are all great questions, but I would suggest posting each one individually so that they can all get detailed answers! Gurpreet Lally, Admin

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david’s Answer

Hi, Salvador
I have no idea of the answer, but I respect your interest, so I looked to see what I could find. Here are a couple of sites that may help:

https://bsis.ca.gov/industries/syllabus.shtml
https://www.vipfirearmstraining.com/california-security-guard-training
https://www.secguard.net/california-security-guard-training/

The above sites should be helpful to you. I wish you well in your training.
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Scott’s Answer

Salvador, much of what you asked depends on what kind of security position you are going into. Many people start out in entry level security such as at a mall or other public venues. Your training will be minimal, but your responsibilities wont be too involved and your schedule will revolve around the site where you are employed. When I say 'entry level', I mean just that, its a great place to start and see if its something you enjoy. If you get staffed with an organization that provides security at industrial sites, like construction or manufacturing plants, you will receive more specific training. Most of that training will be in SDS hazards and emergency protocols. You schedule will vary, shifts are usually divided into three eight hour shifts. (morning, 0500-1300, day 1300-2100, night 2100 to 0500, or something similar). Night shifts are very cool, you get to see a whole other side of life. If you get staffed with a firm that provides armed security, that is when the training really sets in. Expect to spend at least 40 hours learning escalation of force and use of deadly force protocols. There will probably be first aid as well. Your schedule will depend solely on the organization and what services they provide, but you can expect to spend a few weeks at a time on each shift.
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Cheri’s Answer

Hi Salvador,

I was a Security Officer or S.O. in VA for many years and I worked for more than one company there. I cannot speak to CA's rules & regs but what I can do is answer your questions more generally and with respect to my other-state experience.

1) TRAINING: The answer is likely both. You will likely have formal, classroom style training where you learn and then prove your knowledge via a written exam or other aptitude test AND on-the-job training with a Field Training Officer ("FTO"). The former is to give you a general, often state-required knowledge base, then latter is to give you confidence in your abilities to do your job as that specific company requires per their policy. There are also specific training programs for specialty Security Officers. For example: ATM Security Technicians & School S.O. ("SSOs", some school districts use SROs & SSOs). Many, if not most, states have a curriculum your instructor must follow & a minimum score you must obtain in order to be certified as an S.O. so that you can then get hired and get that on-the-job training.

2) SCHEDULING: SOs like LEOs are required to work nights, weekends, & holidays. Your schedule will depend on your supervisor's ability to schedule his or her personnel. A good scheduler will ensure predictability so each employee knows weeks or even months out which days they will have off. This allows those employees to schedule personal events like doctors appointments, etc without having to take off from work to do so. (Take note of this in case you are ever responsible for publishing a personnel schedule!) It is therefore a good idea during the interview process to ask an employee of that company about the predictability of the work schedule is, how far in advance is it typically posted, are there many surprises with it, etc. Pay attention not just to WHAT they say, but HOW they say it. This will help you discern if the scheduler is competent or not which will help you answer if you want to work there or not. This is true of most jobs that require work outside of "Banker's Hours" which are on a set, predictable schedule of hours they conduct business.

3) GEAR: The gear provided (or not) also likely depends on the company. In VA, the S.O. is responsible for buying their ownand getting it approved by your first-in-line supervisor. Some agencies have uniforming allowances or specifically pay you a tad more AS that allowance to ensure you can buy what you need to do your job properly. If the company does not furnish you with the necessary equipment, ebay is a great cheaper alternative for pre-owned gear! Plus, it's broken-in already. Breaking in a new duty belt is literally a pain! Black Friday sales are amazing for buying gear that you may otherwise not be able to afford. Ypur local police department is not out of the question either because ¹Seasoned LEOs nearly always have spare gear at home they may be willing to give or sell you & ²It's a good idea to do a quick meet-&-greet at your local precinct since you'll likely be interacting with many them in the course of your S.O. shifts. Glock also has a "Blue Line" discount but some research would be need to see if only LEOs qualify or if S.O.s with official state certifications and/or IDs do too.

I hope this helps! Mr. Kirk's links looks very helpful and more specific to your state. Best of luck to you sir!
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Jason’s Answer

Most security companies provide you with training focused on basic rules and behavior and also your specific post orders. The minimum standard should be 40 hours but it varies from company to company. You can always request more training or do training on your own to improve your knowledge.

You're schedule will likely vary but could be fixed hours based on the client. You should decide if you prefer one or the other and seek out those roles. You also want to keep in mind the emergencies where you may get called in to cover for someone who is sick or if there is a situation happening that requires more people.

Depending on the job type and industry, you could receive a uniform, tools for the job like a flashlight or radio, and company mobile phone.
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