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If you were a transfer student (community college to a 4-year university), what was your experience like?

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Paul’s Answer

It was actually very positive experience, but there were reasons why it went smoothly. The first is because I got my associates degree. This allowed me to complete the first two years of college and avoid the general university requitements at the four year university.

Another reason it went well is because I attended a college that had a direct transfer agreement (DTA) with the community college I attended. This agreement enabled me to transfer all of my credits and allowed me to start working on my major.

I attended the community college for three years. I took advantage of this time to get extra credit courses so I would not have to take them at the four year.

So, my experience was very good, because I had the associates degree, went to a university that had a direct transfer agreement, and I had extra credits, which transferred well into my major area of study.
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Michel’s Answer

Mine was great. I went to community college after being in the military for five years. I had a great time at community college smaller class size and pretty great teachers. I took the hardest classes I could find in community college and for the most part they were equivalent to difficulty to some of the harder classes at the university. Community college is a great place for people to start to dip their toes into college and it doesn’t hold you back like once believed. I went from a tiny Community college to a state university to a private ivy league for medical school. The most important thing to do while in school is learn and find things you enjoy. If you enjoy volunteering go volunteer and make a difference. If you love research get research time in. These are the big things that colleges are going to ask you when going for graduate programs. Most schools just want people who are going to be able to graduate and succeed if you show a good trend in community college they are not going to be worried about you.
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Christina’s Answer

Hi there,
I personally have not went from a community college to a 4 year collage. However, I have many friend that have and they have a variety of experiences.

One person told me it was the best thing they did financially . They were able to take all their core classes for a much more affordable price saving them a few dollars before taking their major classes. They also said it was a little more challenging work wise.
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Dana’s Answer

My experience was pretty good.

Sometimes your credits may not transfer 100%; for example, my economics credit didn't transfer correctly. But I disputed it, since I had an Associates degree and they accepted me, so I felt the school was just trying to wring more money from me. I was actually successful in disputing that, so don't just go by their first decision.

The general education stuff let me get exposure to different things, and I did actually get some computer science classes, which let me try it out before committing to tens of thousands of dollars of student loans.
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David’s Answer

I did not do this but I know many people who have an say it was one of the best decisions they have made. Some have gone on to be engineers, doctors, attorneys dentists and successful business owners. Community college tuition is usually much cheaper than the universities. Target the university that you want to attend and see if there is a community college where the credits for general education credits and electives are accepted by the university.
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Brandon’s Answer

I owe my career to community college and would recommend it over directly enrolling in a four-year university out of high school. I completed my undergraduate degree at a local community college and then matriculated to the University of California Santa Barbara thanks to a transfer agreement between the two schools. This saved me thousands of dollars in upfront costs, allowed me to work & save money while living at home, guaranteed admission to the school of my choice, and allowed me to file for additional financial aid upon transferring.
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David’s Answer

Mine was positive with a lesson learned. I restarted my education goals after several years in retail management. Community College offered the best fit in terms of class size and schedule. Once I realized I wanted to complete my Engineering degree, I applied to major University and was accepted. In hindsight, I feel like the education part was more personal and effective at a Community College than the Major University.

Completing as many core classes at a community college, Language 101, Algebra, Calculus, Psychology, etc. that will transfer to a major university can be beneficial depending on how they transfer. Some schools have it worked out the credits and grades transfer others only the credit will transfer. For anyone returning to college or questioning how they will do in terms of grades, having just the credit transfer before starting your specific major classes can lead to a better graduating GPA.

Last few thoughts, the finances of a community college can be very helpful and if you end up with a degree from a 4 Year school, not many will question where the first two years of education were obtained.
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