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What does a good resume need to have for it to be competitive?

I am currently trying to get to an educational institute and become a TA for preschoolers with my experience from being a Resilience Corps Associate for the San José Public Library but they always declined my application because I don’t have ECE units. They tend to give the position to those who already have a degree compared to me who has the experience but not the degree.

Thank you comment icon Hello i would advised using kickresume.com its a service that has previous resumes from real people who got hired at certain positions and will give you a great leg up knowing what the company is looking for in resume layout and perhaps even prerequisites. Grant Edwards

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Subject: Career question for you

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Maciej’s Answer

Hello there, Edith!

My name is Maciej, I'm a Certified Professional Resume Writer and a Career Expert at Zety. Let me help you!

For a teacher assistant (TA) position, especially in a preschool setting, having a competitive resume involves showcasing a combination of relevant experience, skills, and qualifications. Here's what you can include to make your resume stand out, even if you don't have ECE units or a degree:

  • Highlight Relevant Experience: Emphasize your experience as a Resilience Corps Associate for the San José Public Library.

  • Emphasize Education and Training: Highlight any relevant education or training you've completed, such as workshops, seminars, or online courses related to early childhood education or child development.

  • Showcase Transferable Skills: Highlight skills valuable in a TA role, such as communication, teamwork, patience, creativity, and adaptability.

  • Express Enthusiasm and Passion: Convey your genuine interest in working with preschoolers and supporting their educational development.

  • Customize Your Resume: Tailor your resume to the specific requirements of the TA position you're applying for.

  • Provide References and Recommendations: Include references or letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with your work.

  • Be Transparent About Your Goals: Acknowledge your current qualifications and express your willingness to pursue further education and training in early childhood education.


By emphasizing your relevant experience, skills, passion, and commitment to ongoing learning, you can create a competitive resume that demonstrates your suitability for a TA position, even without ECE units or a degree. Additionally, consider reaching out to educational institutes directly to express your interest, inquire about their requirements, and explore opportunities for professional development.

Hope this helps! Good luck on your journey. If you have any more questions, I believe this guide might help you a lot: Teaching Assistant Resume . It's for a general TA, but I am sure you'll find a lot of valuable information there and a template that will make inspire you to write your own resume.
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Ujunwa 'UJ'’s Answer

A good resume should be well-organized and easy to read, with a clear summary of your skills and experience. It should be clear, concise, and easy to read. It should highlight your most relevant skills and experiences and demonstrate how you can add value to the organization. Here are some key elements that a competitive resume should have:
1. Contact Information: Include your name, phone number, email address, and LinkedIn profile (if you have one) at the top of your resume.
2. Summary Statement: A summary statement should be a brief overview of your skills and experience, highlighting the most important qualifications you bring to the table.
3. Work Experience: Your work experience should be listed in reverse chronological order (i.e., most recent job first), with bullet points describing your accomplishments and responsibilities in each role.
4. Education: List your degrees and any relevant coursework or certifications.
5. Skills: Include a section listing your relevant skills, such as software proficiency, language fluency, or technical expertise.
6. Achievements: Highlight any specific achievements or awards you've received throughout your career.
7. Customization: Tailor your resume to the specific job you're applying for, highlighting the skills and experiences that are most relevant to the position.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for taking the time to help. Edith
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Gunjan’s Answer

I agree with Gennie on this. There are no golden rules but also understand that a resume can not be one size fit all approach. Look at the job requirements and tailor your resume to highlight your experience and keywords. A resume is a good tool to get your foot in for an Interview but in the end Interview skills and knowledge is critical to get the job.
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Jodie’s Answer

1. Aesthetically pleasing - try to stand out a bit.
2. Highlight what you did and the impact it had.
3. Be consistent with punctuation.
4. Do not use "I" anywhere in your resume.
5. Have a summary that highlights who you are and what skills you bring to the table.
6. Have a bunch of people proof-read your resume and give you feedback - not just friends but professionals as well.
7. Have a standard resume built, but then tailor it to the role you're applying to.
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Balvinder’s Answer

1. A good resume must have accurate, clear data, for example if the dates of employment are inconsistent (meaning youe resume shows you worked at two or more places at the same time) a hiring manager may look at that and pass-up the resume. If you did have two ore more jobs at the same time (for example worked one in the day time and another in the evening etc), I would recommend indicating you worked specific hours at each places (as applicable). This would elimiate the thought from a hiring manager that there are any typos in your resume dates.
2. In your summary, indicating what you are seeking is very important so that a hiring manager is clear as to what you want. A good example of this would be "seeking a Project Manager role in the Wireless Telecom industry".
3. If you have done any volunteer experience, list it in your resume under the heading "Volunteer Experience"; if the volunteer experience is not related to the job you are seeking. If the volunteer experience is related to your job, then list it under Work Experience.
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Erick’s Answer

Resume should include current and previous job or internship experiences. Outlining your goal for joining the company. Good professional references. Educations and certifications you have.
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Clif’s Answer

First of all....DON'T GET DISCOURAGED! Many times a recruiter will screen applications based on the job requirements, but I would highlight your experience in your cover letter to try to catch the interest of the person reviewing the resumes. Also, maybe consider returning to school to get the degree/certification in the field that you are interested in. It's never too late to improve yourself!
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Sarah’s Answer

Hi! I would recommend quantifying your resume as much as possible and giving as much detail you can. This allows the resume screener to truly understand the impact you have made, and also makes you stand out. For example, instead of saying you conducted market sizing, you could say "sized the XX market at $3B, offering them a potential customer base of XX." This shows your research and impact. In addition, use strong verbs, avoid grammatical errors, and keep simple/effective formatting. Best of luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Edith
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Mike’s Answer

Try to get a few letters of recommendation from former supervisors, lead teachers and even parents. While you may have a challenge at some places, schools are struggling to find good people. These letters would support everything you have on your resume and what you are communicating with potential employers.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Edith
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O’s Answer

A good resume needs to have tactical point of knowledge andbexperience in a certain field of employment and a vision of howbyou can help the company and or your team to achieive it's highest marks during your time at the company in that specific roll always leadingbto a chance at advancement in a much promonante assignment duty profile.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, O! Edith
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david’s Answer

Hello, edith,
You're up against a tall wall, and it's almost impossible to climb over. I also faced that issue when I was approx your age. Many companies have strict policies for a degree requirement, and applications without the degree are rejected immediately. You are wanting to work in a career area where degrees are routine, so the challenge is tough. When dealing with children, it is 'safer' to make certain requirements mandatory to avoid future legal issues. My suggestion is to emphasize prior experience, and also to have a cover letter. From my experience, cover letters tend to be read, even when resumes are not. I do encourage you to also consider other career areas that will capitalize on your experience. All the best.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Edith
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Dave’s Answer

Know your audience and cater to what they want to know, and try to stand out amongst the other applicants.
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Tony’s Answer

What I look for is a nice formatted resume. I like a lot of detail around experience and training. Try to keep the most relevant experience toward the top of the resume.
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David’s Answer

If you are in a position that you don't have the Degree credentials that the company is asking for you may be in a precarious situation. First off you have to make sure that your wording in your resume reflects what the job posting description is asking for. Make sure that you are not using a standard resume for all applications. If you find that your resume is not getting through the ATS system, try reaching out to the hiring manager and networking any way you can. Sometimes reaching the right person will make all the difference. If all else fails, it may be time to look into formal training. There are plenty of online opportunities for working adults that allow you to take the course when ever it is convenient. Hopefully everything works out for you.
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Gennie A’s Answer

Difficult one to answer. You need to design your resume to the field you are looking at. There is no golden master resume. The job opportunity gives you keys to highlight in your resume, I highly suggest you use the same words or any experiences you have or desires to learn about anything that is mentioned in the job opportunity so the interviewer can feel your interest and HR teams who are looking for specifics will see these key words in your submission.
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Fin’s Answer

Keep your resume in this case to 2 pages. Detail all your experience and previous positions that are similar to what you are applying for. Detail what you are looking for at the top/start of your resume
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