Skip to main content
5 answers
6
Asked 160 views

How do you know what nursing specialty is right for you?

I’m a sophomore nursing major and I am constantly changing my mind about what I might specialize in

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

5 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

T.J.’s Answer

Hello Layla!

Here's some suggestions for choosing a specialty/path in nursing.

1. Answer questions on a career quiz. Here's one for Finding a Specialty: https://nursing.jnj.com/find-my-specialty/

2. Imagine where you want to work. Nurses can work in:
- Schools
- Health clinics, centered around dieticians, dermatology, or another medical focus.
- Summer camps
- Diagnostic centers
- Outpatient venues
- Telehealth or remote (which is new!)

When you think of places, you start to ask yourself, "Do I prefer to support kids, adults, elderly, or all ages?" and "How do I like the idea of working in a slow paced or fast paced environment?" Consider how you want to solve problems and who you want to serve.

3. Follow nurses and nurse content. You can watch the following videos from nurses & hear their professional advice:
- RegisteredNurseRN | https://youtu.be/jyhdK82fg0E
- Nurse Zara | https://youtu.be/PMFg2xRfcAg
- Buck Parker, M.D. | https://youtu.be/EnKXFhO_028
- Will Kelly, NP | https://youtu.be/nrVnW4y6HlM

After you've explored online, you can do these things to help you narrow down your path:

1. Write down at least three areas that interests you
2. Dive into researching/looking at these areas.
3. Write some of the daily tasks that appeal to you
4. Speak to nurses in your area. Either people in the field, recent graduates, or senior students.

Sending you encouragement as you find your specialty :)
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jennifer’s Answer

Once you are doing your clinical rotations you will be able to determine what you are comfortable with, what challenges you and what interests you the most. Hopefully the answer is the same for all three of those options. If not use these to develop a list of what specialties to eliminate and narrow the list down from there.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Marie’s Answer

Finding your place in the nursing field can be difficult. There is so many options to choose from these days. Do not commit to a specialty until you are sure it is right for you. As I learned recently there can be upto 100 different specialty in Healthcare today. Your possibles are endless. First you need to decide if you want inpatient or outpatient care. Some hospitals offer a Star program that allows you to pick from different specialtys and choose what you like after the year long program. This program requires a commit to the hospital. Hospitals also offer nurse apprentice programs for nursing students. That may be an option for you. If you are still unsure of were you want to work, start with general floor nursing and work out from the. Do I like taking care adults or children.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Char’s Answer

Hi Layla,
The good thing about nursing is, you can change your specialty anytime you want. You may start off wanting to do a particular specialty and as you go on your journey, you may find something else that interests you. You might also find that the specialty you chose wasn't what you thought it would be. You're never locked into a specialty and quite frankly, in nursing, you're most valuable when you have a range of experiences.

My nursing journey started over 10 years ago and is still evolving. I started off in med/surg just to get floor experience. I knew I wanted to work as a leader in the community in some way but I didn't know how until I got to public health semester.

I ended up getting my public health certificate and even landing a job with my county after only a year as med/surg nurse. I didn't take the job because I realized I didn't really like the job description. I thought public health nursing would look a certain way, but for my county, it looked different. I decided to stay in med/surg.

I started precepting on the floor and enjoyed it. I decided to go back to school to be a clinical instructor. After doing that, I realized that I'd rather teach in the classroom so I started on that path.... and the list goes on....

I bring all of this up to show you that your nursing journey can take you all over the place. I would say start at a hospital first if possible. Med/surg or telemetry is probably the easiest to get into. Then let your journey reveal your next path. It could happen as you take classes in nursing school or it could happen as you start working. Good luck to you!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Layla,

Guide to Identifying Your Ideal Nursing Specialty

Selecting a nursing specialty can seem daunting due to the vast array of choices, each possessing its own distinct roles, work settings, and skill requirements. Here's a step-by-step guide to help you pinpoint the nursing specialty that's perfect for you:

Self-Exploration: Take time to evaluate your interests, values, and strengths. Think about the patient demographics you enjoy serving, the work environments where you excel, and the tasks that invigorate you. For example, if you have a deep love for children, pediatrics could be your calling. If you thrive in dynamic settings, consider emergency medicine.

Investigation: Once you've identified your interests and strengths, delve into researching various nursing specialties. Examine the routine responsibilities, education prerequisites, career progression prospects, and salary expectations. Resources like the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) can offer invaluable insights.

Practical Exposure: Accumulate experience in diverse nursing fields through internships, job shadowing, or volunteering. This practical exposure can give you a glimpse into the reality of a specific specialty, aiding you in making an informed choice.

Academic Requirements: Certain nursing specialties necessitate extra education or certifications. Ensure to verify if the specialty you're contemplating requires any specific training or degrees beyond your current studies.

Guidance: Connect with mentors in the field you're exploring. They can share firsthand experiences about the advantages and challenges of their specialty and provide advice on how to navigate that route.

Test Run: If feasible, experiment with a specific specialty during a trial period or on a per-diem basis. This can offer a snapshot of the daily work and help you determine if it's the right match.

Networking: Participate in industry events, become a member of professional groups, and establish connections with professionals in your field of interest. Networking can unveil opportunities and offer valuable insights into various nursing specialties.

Reassessment: As you accumulate more experience and knowledge, revisit your decision. Changing your mind is perfectly fine - many nurses transition between specialties throughout their careers as their interests and objectives evolve.

In conclusion, pinpointing the right nursing specialty involves self-exploration, investigation, practical exposure, understanding academic requirements, seeking guidance, test runs, networking, and continuous reassessment. By adhering to these steps, you can discover a nursing specialty that resonates with your interests, values, and strengths, paving the way for a gratifying and rewarding healthcare career.

May God bless you!
James Constantine.
0