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Why would someone choose to get a higher degree (Master's, PHD, etc.)?

I am a high school student wondering what benefits come with getting different degrees.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Katharine’s Answer

Hi Isabella! Some careers require advanced education, and some do not. For example, to teach and conduct research at a University you may need a PhD, or someone might want to dive into deep statistical learning and the best way they find to do that is a Master's. And sometimes it's just what people do because they feel like they should.

I grew up with a father with a PhD and a mother with an MA, so I always felt like I needed to go to graduate school because it was "expected" of me. I did a semester before realizing it wasn't for me, and now I'm well into my career without any regrets about having just a BA. It's about finding out what works for you and what you want to do. And don't forget that there isn't a cutoff for graduate school! I know people who got their PhDs in their 70s! Many paths are open to you, don't pigeonhole yourself now.
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T.J.’s Answer

Hello Isabella!

Katherine's answer explained it well. Getting a Master depends on the career.
It's important to research jobs requirements so you can invest your time and money well.

- Here are jobs that require a Master's degree: https://www.gograd.org/resources/careers-that-require-a-graduate-degree/

- Here are jobs that require a Bachelor's degree: https://www.newsweek.com/75-highest-paying-jobs-that-require-bachelors-degree-1601993

- Here are jobs that 𝐝𝐨𝐧'𝐭 require a bachelor's degree: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/finding-a-job/jobs-without-a-degree

Enjoy learning more about careers :)
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Jason’s Answer

Higher degrees and their reasons vary based on your career field. In some higher degrees are required such as many medical professions, social work, and academia in order to get a license to be employable.
For others such as myself i chose to get a masters to learn more about a subject that interested me and also would potentially open new opportunities for me to grow my career. While you don’t necessarily need a degree to work in my field you notice the higher you move within many companies most people tend to have them as the degree provides some skills that will be used on the job.
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Molly’s Answer

Hello Isabella!

Great question! As I was about to graduate from my Undergraduate, I also was questioning if I even wanted to get my Masters or a further education. Along with that, I wondered, if at all, would I need one for the future. I can honestly tell you that I was so glad I went ahead and got my Masters for 2 simple reasons: Appreciation of one's self and Job Support.

At first, I dreaded going back into school as I had just graduated from my undergraduate program in college. I regretted applying and questioned why I had initially partook in another degree. However, after beginning the course and learning more and more about my degree from a specific point of view, it was quite enjoyable and I really loved getting to complete assignments and tests based on my specific subject. Within undergrad, you can major in large amounts of areas. However, in a Masters or PhD program, you get to successfully focus in one certain topic. In this case, I majored in Organizational Behavior and Human Resources. After graduating from the Majors program, I can tell you that going through the process was indeed time consuming, but one of the best times and experiences EVER that I would recommend to do.

Along with this, many businesses once you graduate from college or a degree program focus in the level of education and certain degrees that you obtain. For that very reason as well, I decided to go through with the program. And quite frankly, that may be a prior reason why I have the career I do today. Though it does not matter fully if you have a degree or not, a lot of companies focus in that area as compared to prior experience within a certain subject or focus depending on the job being applied for.

I hope this helped Isabella, and good look with your further acquisitions in the future!
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Lesly’s Answer

Hello! Numerous motives inspire individuals to pursue advanced degrees. One reason could be to embark on a fresh career path in a desired profession. Another might be to gear up for doctoral-level studies. Expanding one's expertise in areas connected to their existing professional specializations is also a common goal. Additionally, delving into a beloved subject and investigating potential job opportunities in related fields can be equally compelling reasons. Keep going, and you'll surely achieve your dreams!
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Briana’s Answer

- Some people enjoy working in academia over industry and prefer things like teaching, supervising, and research in their field of expertise.

- Many career paths require professional school (e.g., doctors, dentists, lawyers, therapists, etc) before you can become licensed to practice.

- Graduate school helps people become more knowledgeable (and oftentimes more marketable from a job search standpoint) in their field.

- Some Bachelor's degrees are difficult to find a job with if you don't have more specialized education. For example, an English undergraduate degree may be too general, but a Master's degree in English Instruction is not.
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