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High school courses for law school?

What high school courses to take if I’m interested in law after high school .

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Michael’s Answer

The idea of attending law school is truly commendable – great job! It's important to think about the specific area of law you'd like to focus on during this time as well.

Building a strong foundation in subjects such as public speaking, writing, social studies, government, history, and political science will provide you with an excellent starting point.

Additionally, cultivate a passion for serving and assisting others.

Wishing you all the best,

Michael P.
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Christina’s Answer

Law school is notoriously difficult to get into. It can also sometimes be hard to find employment after. One piece of advice someone told me when I was looking at this career option was to think about a specialty. By doing this, you have a much clearer story to show law schools when it comes to application time making you stand out from the competition who all took the same courses. Research the types of law.

For example, International Law practitioners need second language skills doubling down on studying Spanish, French or Chinese or other major international languages would be of use.

Tech lawyers would be served in studying Computer science and ethics course. Patent lawyers understand how the US patent system works. You could think of getting internships with companies in specific areas, even something at the front desk answering phones.

So, take the standard courses but also take some courses that will make you stand out from the crowd.
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Adrianna’s Answer

English and Logic classes for the following reasons:

English - helps you expand your vocabulary and broaden your vernacular which can aide when it comes to debating, rationalizing and rebutting.

Logic (symbolic logic, if available) - more so will help you prepare for the LSAT
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Mahera’s Answer

Enroll in courses that strengthen your analytical and numerical thinking abilities, such as Logic (a philosophy class) and Math. Additionally, participate in classes that assist you in expressing your perspective, like Philosophy, English, and History courses.
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Madeline’s Answer

I am NOT a lawyer BUT I do know that strong language skills and critical thinking are the most highly-valued skills in law. If the classes are available, I would load up on Literature, Political Science, and anything that can help

Agreed with all responses above - Debate, Journalism, really ANY way you can practice articulating and honing your craft in writing - those will all be invaluable. And lastly - READ!
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Caira’s Answer

Hi there! I'd suggest taking classes that challenge you and push you outside of your comfort zone. I'd suggest getting involved in clubs or activities where you may have to present, memorize key information, and/ or be forward facing such as debate clubs, musical performances, student leadership/councils. In terms of actual classwork- focus on building your critical thinking skills and enhancing your abilities to write, increase your vocabulary, and read for comprehension (english, literature, etc.)
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Nicholas’s Answer

Take everything you can, at the highest level you can, first and foremost! I imagine you have access to AP courses, try to take all of those that you can, especially English and History perhaps.

If your school has a Debate program or class, perhaps a Journalism class or club, anything that involves communication and interaction with others. They may be the best prep for Law you can get in high school. If there's any specific Law programs or clubs at your school, definitely do those!
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Gina’s Answer

Hi Ingrid,
I would try to join Youth and Government, Debate Team or Mock Trial if you have any of those clubs available to you. Try to load your schedule with writing/english or history classes. Most of my law class and colleagues were/are high achievers in writing. Remember you will need an undergraduate degree before your 3 years of law school so try to enjoy the studies along the way!
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Kaushik’s Answer

Hey Ingrid, terrific question!

Just to let you know, I'm not a lawyer, so I can't dive into the details of law studies after high school. But, in high school, your main goal should be to create a strong base of knowledge and start working on key skills you'll need as a lawyer.

For the knowledge part, classes related to social studies, civics, and American history are super important. They'll help you learn more about the American legal system and introduce you to some well-known cases from the past.

To sharpen other skills, I'd say go for any public speaking class or join activities like the debate club. These will boost your overall communication skills and let you experience dealing with different viewpoints. Also, pay some attention to math and statistics, as many cases require handling complicated and big sets of numbers. I can tell you from my own experience as a Math major that the problem-solving abilities you gain in math classes can be useful in all areas of life.

I hope this advice helps, and I wish you the best in becoming an amazing lawyer, Ingrid!
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Erin’s Answer

Hi! It's amazing that you're thinking ahead!
I once aimed to attend law school, so I can offer some insights based on the guidance I received back then.
There's no specific major or particular course prerequisites for law school (unlike pre-med programs). I was encouraged to enroll in classes that would enhance my writing, reasoning, and research abilities, which can be found across various fields of study.
You might want to explore courses in liberal arts subjects such as government, history, political science, sociology, psychology, philosophy, English, and so on. Additionally, your high school might offer extracurricular activities that can help you develop the skills needed for a successful legal career (like mock trial, debate, and others).

Wishing you the best on your journey!
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Maheshika’s Answer

It's fantastic that you're thinking about attending law school!
Here are some subjects and activities to consider:
- Participate in classes or activities that involve public speaking
- Consider joining the debate club
- Social studies
- Political science
- History
Additionally, it would be excellent if you can secure an internship at the Attorney General's Office or a law firm.
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Adaleigh’s Answer

I suggest signing up for a Debate Team if your school offers one.

For classes, consider taking Mock Trial, U.S. History, Government/Politics, English, and Writing, as they can all help you.

Since law school involves reading, research, writing, and debating, any courses that let you develop these skills will be useful.
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Becky’s Answer

Research into the Fort Worth ISD programs shows that one school in the district offers a legal services CTE program https://www.fwisd.org/cms/lib/TX01918778/Centricity/Domain/168/LPS.pdf

If you are already a student set to go to this school, check with your counselor about enrolling in the program. Being able to participate for 4 years in the path gives you the opportunity to engage in an internship in the field. If you are not a student, but have the means to attend the school that offers this program, you may want to talk to your parents about a transfer to the school for your high school career.

If being part of this type of program is not an option, then there are a few questions to ask yourself, what kind of law would you like to practice? Corporate law, family law, immigration law, criminal law, etc... This can give you a direction in what high school classes you can take as foundational information classes to build your knowledge base to support your career in law.

Typically, Texas school districts have limited offerings of classes that support more advanced studies for law in general at the high school level. More options may be available at your local community college. In Texas, successful completion of 8th grade qualifies you to take classes at the local community college. Be aware that in many cases these classes are in addition to your normal high school workload if taken before your are classified as a junior in high school. Using this path, however, you can complete your junior and senior high school level english, government, economics and math requirements and the corresponding higher ed requirement with a single class rather than one for high school and one for college giving you a more efficient path to completing a bachelors degree in pursuit of a JD. When choosing the classes you want to take at a community college prior to transferring into a 4 year program, use https://tccns.org/ website to make sure your community college credits will transfer into the 4 year program you want to attend.

Best of luck in your path to a JD.
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