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How did you find your "Why" and when did you realise you did?

How did you find your 'Why', and when did you realise you did.

Im currently a High school graduate planning to attend a four year University. I was never 100% percent sure what I wanted to major in because I wanted to do/experience everything. Adults always told me when you find something you love you won't ever think about it being a job. How did you know that was what you wanted to do, and why?

Thank you comment icon Hello Cortnae, Truthfully, at our current age, it's challenging to fully grasp the reasons and meanings behind everything. That's why it's always beneficial to talk with older individuals who comprehend us and have a deeper understanding of the world around us. By following their guidance, you can embark on a journey, gain valuable experience, and gradually develop a clearer sense of your direction in life. So, if you're feeling determined at a young age, embrace it wholeheartedly. If you're uncertain, seek the wisdom of your elders. Ultimately, you'll find yourself exactly where you're meant to be. Wishing you the very best! Mrinalini Singh

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Subject: Career question for you

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Linda’s Answer

The thing is, there isn't a very clear "THIS IS THE POINT OF TRUE SATISFACTION" if that makes sense. This is something that evolves throughout your life as you learn and experience more. If you asked me in college, I would have said it was learning about graphic design as a career option. Now, I would say it's gardening and plants that are my love. Don't feel pressured or nervous about that imaginary moment. Some people find that "why" in their professional career. Some find it in their off time or with their family. I know many professionals who have a job that allows them to balance their love on their off hours. Experience does help you find it but honestly, I personally feel it's something that finds you. Don't rush and feel you need to know ASAP. There are a lot of people who don't discover it till after college or even in retirement. It will come when it will come.

For me, it was about finding something I was good enough at to work in. I fell into art and graphic design around my senior year of high school entirely by accident. It was something that I sincerely enjoyed and had talent in. After college and my first professional job, I began to really hate the work. Some jobs and coworkers can destroy an industry for you. During the pandemic, I got into gardening for no reason and fell head over heels. It's something that gives me peace. Now, graphic design work allows me to indulge in what I love.

I hope this helps.
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Martha’s Answer

Hi Cortnae - the fact that you are thinking about this issue tells me that you are a thoughtful person. To restate Linda's and Sara's assurances, it is fine to still be looking for your "why" at this stage of life. In fact, maybe it is good to go into college open to new fields of study and professional paths because you will learn about them from fellow students as well as professors and guest speakers. As you have more work experiences and life experiences, and give yourself time to reflect on them, your "why" will become clearer.

But please note what else they said. If "why" means purpose to you, it may not (and maybe should not) be entirely wrapped up in your work. Your contribution to the world might be through your family and friends, hobbies, community, social issues important to you or some combination thereof. They also indicated that it could come later in life or change over time. You may receive advice (as this is) and feel societal expectations, but ultimately, you decide what is meaningful for you.

Good luck, and we hope that you have a terrific experience in college!
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Sara’s Answer

I found my "why" by taking the long route. I chose a university that had all four areas of study I was debating between, I did change both my major and my minor by my second year. Even after I completed the program I still didn't know what I wanted my career to be. I found a job path that I could do well enough to get promotions in, but I wasn't happy to be there. Then I read _What Color is Your Parachute_, That book gave me insight to go back to college for a new degree and I have been in the same career path for about 15 years. It is nice to enjoy your job, but it is also important to surround yourself with people you enjoy and hobbies you like. Work is a part of each day, but it is not your life.
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