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If i wanted to go to college or university to become a registered nurse, how many years will I need?

If i wanted to go to college or university to become a registered nurse, how many years will I need? Some people say it depends and others are saying 2 years, so please help me..!

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John’s Answer

After you complete high school, a variety of avenues to explore nursing will be available to you. I strongly suggest setting your sights on obtaining a registered nurse (RN) license rather than a licensed practical nurse (LPN) license. This is because an RN license opens the door to a wider array of opportunities. You have the choice between a 2-year associate degree (ADN) or a 4-year bachelor degree (BSN), both of which will equip you to take the licensing exam and become an RN.

The ideal route to an RN license is largely influenced by your financial situation. If you're seeking a swift, budget-friendly path, the ADN program is your golden ticket. These programs are usually offered by community colleges, which are considerably less expensive than private institutions. Additionally, many states provide free tuition for a 2-year period at community colleges for fresh graduates, so don't forget to check that out.

An ADN doesn't restrict your clinical abilities. Given the current nursing shortage in the US, RNs are highly sought after, which means you'll likely encounter job opportunities in a variety of fields as long as you maintain a valid license. Although a BSN offers extra opportunities, it can be pricey, particularly if pursued through a private college, and it's not a mandatory requirement to begin working as an RN. If you kickstart your journey with an ADN and later decide to upgrade your education to a BSN for a managerial position, a research role, or to become a nurse practitioner, many employers provide tuition reimbursement.

Here's wishing you nothing but success on your journey.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Sus !

I see that you have a marvelous interest in one of the most useful, caring professions !

Length of time in college always depends on the person as sometimes people take breaks or transfer to a different college, depends on the track of study you take, or things come up, but I will try to put it in general perspective for you so you can get a basic idea.

If you get a Bachelors degree in nursing, it will be a four year course of study and you will be an RN. If you go for two more years, if you choose to, you will be an advanced RN. You can also be an RN with an Associates Degree and that would be two to three years in school. Getting the Associates Degree is the shortest path. So it greatly depends on how much time you can or want to dedicate to it.

Just some advice - I would greatly advise against rushing through this course of study with accelerated or graduating faster offers. Nursing is a science and requires complete, steady, evenly paced study and no one should cut corners when the care of patients is involved. The good thing is that once you do finish the formal course of study, get your degree, obtain employment, the learning never ends. You will actually learn on the jobs through actual events, In-Service trainings, seminars, conferences - it is on-going. These actual supplemental learning experiences will depend on your employer.

Your best bet is to enroll in the program that you think you can do at first. If it is the two year Associates program, see how you feel once you finish. You may want to go on for the Bachelors degree. Each step you take in your education will benefit you in your career. Regardless of how long you stay in school, your professors and on campus advisers will be there for you to give you great support.

Best wishes to you and may you have a wonderful time in nursing school !
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DaSabria’s Answer

Hello,

You have three primary avenues to pursue a career as a registered nurse: obtaining a Nursing Diploma, earning an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), or completing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). The Nursing Diploma, which takes 1-2 years to finish, is the quickest path. However, employers often favor nurses who hold a BSN. The ADN, typically a stepping stone towards a BSN, takes 2 years to complete. I believe it's an excellent starting point for newcomers to the field, allowing you to begin working without the stress of pursuing a BSN straight away, which can be both financially and mentally taxing. The BSN, on the other hand, takes 4 years to complete, making it a longer and more expensive commitment compared to the 2-year programs. I hope this information aids you in making your choice. Remember, keep your eyes on the prize and stay driven. Best of luck to you!
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Marlena’s Answer

Sus, great question. For an RN, yes, typically it's two years. An LPN one-year, for a bachelors add 18 months to two years. Plus if you have pre-requisites, it could be one to two more if you're unable to do them during program or in high school under dual credit. However, highly qualified, motivated, skilled students can be taken into a fast track program where an RN degree is 9 months in a teaching hospital. They only take a select few but if you're smart, motivated, ready for long hours, and want dedicated time to hands on, look into those! It's worth it ive been told by those who have been through them.

Marlena recommends the following next steps:

Fast track nursing degree
LPN
RN
LPN to BSN
Nursing Diploma Hospital
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