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What does computer engineering really entail of besides the core classes, like math and science I'm a prospective freshman and have not any experience of electrical or engineering classes, and i wonder if it is for me??

TTU freshman
computer engineering/science field
career search
no experience
like math

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Paul’s Answer

The Math and Science classes are simply a foundation, teaching you fundamental skills that you need to understand the actual engineering classes you'll take in your second-year curriculum and beyond. Without successfully completing them first, it would be like trying to build a house without understanding why they don't fall down once they're built. That being said, if you understand Math and Science well enough to successfully complete those early courses, you have the skills to tackle the engineering courses. All you need to do is figure out what you're interested in, and what seems exciting to learn. Someone else recommended getting a description of the courses offered as part of the degree-based curriculum at a college offering engineering degrees. That's a great way to see the difference between the different disciplines within engineering, such as mechanical vs. electrical, chemical vs. computer engineering, and more. That way you can get a feel for where your interests lie. Fun fact, I started off in school intending to study mechanical engineering and switched to electrical engineering in my sophomore year. It just clicked with me more, and I found it more interesting. Many of the courses overlap in the first couple of years, so I lost no progress toward the degree in the process.

Paul recommends the following next steps:

Most colleges have their curriculums and course descriptions online.
Read through them and see what sparks an interest for you.
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Dan’s Answer

A Computer Engineering (CE) degree is a blend of hardware and software classes (including math) that allows you to work across a wide variety of job/career positions. Your career will involve both software and hardware although it could focus heavily on one and much less on the other. And the industry applications can vary greatly with examples such as automotive, medical, process control, product manufacturing, robotics, cell phones, etc. When you take classes, you will gain experience and will form interests (say software verse hardware) and will likely adjust your class options to align with your interests. When you graduate, you will again align your job search to your industry interests. If you are willing to travel or relocate, your options will be even greater.

In conclusion, you will have many options, both in school and when in the workforce. If you like to (always) learn new things, solve problems, and do not fear math and science, then I have no doubt that you will enjoy and prosper with a Computer Engineering degree (CE).

Dan recommends the following next steps:

Always ask your professors and other students to explain about their industry experiences (many of your fellow students may already be working in industry). This is a great way to gain knowledge about engineering options.
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Mickael’s Answer

There is a lot in computer engineering.
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Computer engineering is defined as the discipline that embodies the science and technology of design, construction, implementation, and maintenance of software and hardware components of modern computing systems and computer-controlled equipment.
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So first, there is a distinction between software and hardware.

Hardware will definitely require some electrical classes but also protocol, bus and other high-level architecture. Mathematic will be needed, especially when it comes to encryption and self correcting devices.

Software requires more logic, Boolean arithmetic so Mathematics are important and a taste for problem solving and modeling. Finally, you will need to learn to talk to the machine with at least one programming language. And in order to write good program, you may need to know the computer architecture, how it executes your code so that it is efficient.

And then there is the builder, the person who gets the pieces and builds the computer (assembly it) which requires to know the compatibility between the component, but I am pretty certain this is not part of the standard definition of computer engineering.

Finally, most hardware equipments are smart so they include some piece of software (also known as firmware), that you may have to write as a hardware engineer.
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Mark’s Answer

Going to college is quite a costly adventure. Studying engineering is both demanding and rewarding, presenting its own set of challenges. A good idea would be to take a trip to some nearby colleges and have a chat with their friendly admissions team. They'll provide you with a course catalog, which will give you a clear picture of what each major involves and how much it'll cost. If you're unsure about your future path, starting with a 2-year college might be a good fit for you. Remember to pick a school that offers the social activities you enjoy, as these are crucial for your personal growth.

Mark recommends the following next steps:

Vist a few local college admission offices
Take a few college tours
Obtain a course catalog
Determine cost of attendance and financial aid
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