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How do you get a part-time job as a college student?

I don't have a lot of experience in my given field, but I am very inquisitive and a quick learner of all things. Unfortunately, neither of those has helped me get a job in data science (current field) or graphic communications (previous field)

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Subject: Career question for you

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Ahmed’s Answer

Hannah, I'll answer this a bit differently: experiences don't have to be formal work experiences (part-time, internships, etc.) and that's especially true for field such as data science or marketing/graphic design. I recommend you look at starting some of your own personal projects and employing the huge question/challenge banks available online to build a portfolio that speaks to your skillsets. A part-time role is great and builds a formal skillset and I recommend you continue looking at opportunities within your close network and community and building out from there -- but you can equally supplement that with a personal portfolio that reflects your ability to solve various challenges and problems and showcases the tools or products you're able to ideate. This goes a long way...and in many cases it shows more to your skillset vs. a part-time opportunity, at least that's the case for specific fields in the industry.
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Tamara’s Answer

If you're keen to land a job in your chosen field, the first step is to contact the organization directly and inquire about their internship program. Starting as an intern is an excellent way to make your initial entry into the organization. This experience will not only provide you with self-insight and identify areas for improvement, but also give you a deeper understanding of the industry and help you determine if it continues to hold your interest.
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Leo’s Answer

Hannah, this is the way I would approach. Try to find a way to contribute to your community, school or university. If it is not data science or your end goal or most desired field, no problem, the first part is to become part of something. If you can get affiliated to a company or area in the school / university that is tied to your area of interest great, otherwise expand to not become very selective. For example, if you want data science, try to affiliate to data science department in your school or part time jobs related to it. If it does not work, amplify your search, try to get affiliated to the IT area of the same. If it does not work, try to affiliate to a company or school that at least have these areas. Once you are in, the more successful you become in what you are doing, higher will be the changes to get closer and closer to the areas of your interest. Don't refuse job opportunities, everything you do will help you learn and become more prepared for the next challenge.
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Darren’s Answer

Is there a particular company you're interested in? Contact them and let them know, even if they don't have any openings listed. Your personal interest in a company can be attractive to a prospective employer. Tell them why you want to work for them, share your knowledge of the company, tell them why you think you'd be a good fit and how you can help.

I've done this twice in my career. The first time I ended up working at the company for 15 years and the second time was for my current job. I've been there over nine years. The point is that knowing what you want often works better than casting a wide net.
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Wojciech’s Answer

Here are some steps to get you started:
Research Opportunities: Look for part-time job listings in your college's career center, online job boards, or local businesses that match your interests in data science or graphic communications.
Craft Your Resume: Highlight your enthusiasm for learning and any relevant skills, coursework, or projects in your resume. Emphasize your willingness to adapt and grow in the field.
Network: Attend career fairs, workshops, and industry events to connect with professionals and learn about potential job openings. Networking can often lead to hidden job opportunities.
Apply and Customize: Tailor your applications to each position, showcasing how your eagerness to learn and adapt can contribute to the company's success.
Interview Preparation: Practice answering questions that demonstrate your curiosity, adaptability, and desire to learn. Showcase specific examples of how you've quickly acquired new skills or solved problems.
I hope you eventually manage to find something interesting
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Amalya’s Answer

Hi Hannah,

Finding a job is challenging not only for college students, but sometimes even for experienced ones. You can apply for more jobs, checking their application requirements carefully. Try to improve your CV, taking part in internships and work experience programs. You can also work as a freelancer online and offer your services related to your fields.
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Ram’s Answer

Hello Hannah:

The best place to start is in your college. This is what I did when I first started graduate school in 1982 after coming here from India.

Your counselor will be able to help you with contacts at the college career center. In your particular case, you would want to seek opportunities in the Computer Science dept. There are also instances (at least in my case it worked!) where Professors will have a grant and will need help and will usually pick one their students to do the work and pay them to do it. For the student, it helps financially, as well as provide exposure to something they might not be included in their college curriculum.

Hope this helps!
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