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How do you find the right major for you?

I like the film industry and art related things, but it's hard to be successful in those career paths so I don't really know what I want to do in the future. I am not a big STEM person and don't like history either.

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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Helen !

This is a very common issue which many people think of and wonder what to do about. You are correct, it is possible but very challenging to earn a living in film or the arts but many people are successful with those careers, according to how they define "successful". If you are already contemplating or predicting that you won't be a success in those fields, it is indeed time to start thinking about something else. People who go into those careers have a strong drive, motivation and it feels right for them. They are thinking about what they can do now to build up to a professional level eventually. It's time to focus on something you may feel comfortable going into. You can always do art and film as hobbies or a side job when opportunities present themselves.

A way that you can choose an alternative would be to make a list of everything you like doing and a list of jobs that you would never want to do based on the work content, not predicting how much money you think you'd earn. You do not go from novice to overnight sensation. Many professions are entry level - you have to start somewhere - and in time, you progress. No matter which field of work you choose, you will always be learning new aspects of it. You already know that you're not keen on history or any of the STEM, so that is a start.

Think about what your mission is. What do you want to accomplish as a personal goal through your work ? Where are you having positive feedback now ? If you are very, very concerned about income, research which careers pay what you expect and do a bit of looking into each one. Nothing is guaranteed, though. Your monetary gain will depend on what a company offers. Be clear to yourself about what your definition of success really is. No one can guess where they'll be, in what job or career, while in college. Figure out what town or city or area you want to work in and pinpoint the things you want to do and what you are willing to do to achieve it. Try not to be concerned about career outcome or monetary gain right now. Your concern does show that you care about your future, however there is no need to be concerned about things that will happen. It will all unfold naturally, you'll see.

I hope this has helped and I wish you all the best in taking time to decide on a career path that you will love !
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. This is a very common question many students have. In fact, there are many careers not related to STEM. You find out more on file production related careers.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about what you interest, e.g. your hobbies, favourite subjects, etc. and identify the related careers
E.g. If you you like films, would you like to be a movie director, actor, movie critics, journalist, make up artist, etc.
If you like arts, would you like to be a painter, graphic designer, fashion designer, artist, art teacher, etc.
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers you would like to pursue
5. Explore the entry criteria of relevant subjects in the college
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Misael (Misha)’s Answer

Before you settle on a major, it's important to think about a few things. These include how much the program will cost, what kind of salary you're hoping for, and how easy it might be to find a job in that field. But it's not just about the practical stuff. You should also consider who you are as a person, what you want to achieve in your studies and your career, and what really sparks your interest.
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Jasmine’s Answer

I agree with the previous responses. It's okay if you don't know what to major in, many people go to college undecided or even if they are set on a major sometimes, they end up changing it at some point. Think about other majors and possible career paths that interest you. You can take a step further and ask yourself "what kind of jobs will give you the ability to work with your passions or can be a conduit to your passions". If there's something you're passionate about like filming and the arts, maybe there's an opportunity in the business field where you could be a marketer working for a film studio and helping promote their movies or perhaps you really enjoy helping others find and nurture their creative potential so studying to be an educator of the arts could be the path for that. It's good to be open-minded and explore various avenues.

For any schools you're applying to see if there are current students you can speak with to hear about what it's like being in their majors. Contact the career center and ask what kind of jobs and opportunities students have after they graduate. These conversations can help give you clarity about certain majors and if you would actually like studying them in school, but also the different type of opportunities that you might not have been aware of that you can have as a career.

Jasmine recommends the following next steps:

What are you passionate about and your interests?
What possible career paths can be a conduit to your passions/interests or help fund your passions?
Is there an intersection or overlap between certain career paths and what you're passionate about?
Ask people about their majors and careers to help give you some insight.
Remind yourself that it's okay if you don't have everything figured out.
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Laquitta’s Answer

I selected two categories of elective subjects - those that piqued my interest and those that were completely new to me. This experience was truly enlightening. It guided me in honing my preferences and defining my future path, which was a very encouraging process.
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Heather’s Answer

There are many options for a creative person (non-STEM). Start with looking at what you like, favorite school subjects, hobbies, and find the commonalities.

If you like film and making videos, you could consider a marketing role. This type of role could involve things like creating captive short videos for social media, or event marketing that could allow you to leverage your creativity to create an experience for the attendees.

You could go into teaching and be an art teacher, or work in daycare and plan crafts and activities for children.

You could also consider creating a side hustle (freelance) that may involve something creative (design work) while you find your way with your career, and this may help you to do what you love, make money, and potentially grow it into something you could do full time in the future when you are more established.
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