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What do I need to achieve to have these careers And if I wanted to pursue starting a buisness instead of college where do i start? How do you maintain your life outside of school? Why do I need to have a certain degree for something? - thank you!?

How hard is it to be in college

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Subject: Career question for you

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Bhavana’s Answer

Hi There! College questions are good questions...there is peer pressure that it is the right thing to do and it can be, but it has to be right for you. Sometimes you only find out by going to college and trying it out - class by class starting at community college first - it may seem a little redundant from High School, but eventually it can be a way to expand yourself beyond what it taught in High School.

However, you can also learn on-the-job and do well too...it just depends on your career interests. For instance, I am in Human Resources, but I got my degree in 'Management' but I did this after being in the business world for a number of years and having two young children. It was tough going to college and raising my kids, but I was finally determined and passionate enough to engulf every class! I just wasn't ready right after High School, I had more important emotional needs to meet, although I didn't realize that until much later in life and reflecting!

I worked in Human Resources in retail for almost 20 years and supported many individuals who started out of High School and then kept learning and growing, finally becoming the Store Manager or a District Manager without a degree or they went to college along the way. It can be done, but retail is a hard industry for example requiring lots of hours and flexibility...and a love of people!

Now that my children are grown and doing well on their own - I saw them go through their own journeys of college. My son started by going away to a college for one semester and came home to community college and then moved to Florida - worked and did community college - then came home and went to a technical college where he thrived. He did get his Bachelors degree in IT and then when he was working and starting a young family he went back and got his Masters Degree in IT and then he got his MBA!! Two masters degrees when I thought he would never make up his mind about school - LOL! My daughter also started off going away to college at UNLV - I was worried as it is a party school, but she too came home after one semester and decided that college wasn't her path and went to school to become a Vet Tech and she works at a Rescue and loves every moment of every day at work! Saving animals from bad circumstances and death is her passion - she doesn't make a lot of money, but she is so very happy!

Good luck - everyone's path is different!
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Manesh’s Answer

Alright, you've got a few inquiries here. Let's dissect them one by one.

Your career path isn't explicit from your question, but you're curious about whether to kick-start a business or enroll in college. While college isn't a compulsory route, it's an excellent platform to connect with diverse individuals and absorb a variety of ideas. It's a melting pot of aspiring individuals, be it future entrepreneurs or job seekers. Many people conceive their business plans or establish friendships that later evolve into business partnerships in college. So, there are definitely some perks to consider.

However, if you already have a business idea, you might feel the urge to chase it immediately. Don't hesitate to take that leap of faith.

Balancing work and personal life is an ongoing struggle. The ultimate goal is to transform your passion into your profession. When these two aspects harmonize, it creates a synergistic effect. It might not always be feasible, but it's crucial to indulge in your hobbies, sports, music, or anything that brings you joy. Taking out time for these activities daily, even if it's brief, will help maintain your focus as it provides a refreshing break from work.

Is a specific degree a prerequisite? Not always, but it depends on the industry. If you aim to be a doctor, then certainly yes. But for careers like a mechanic or software engineer, it's not a must. These skills can be acquired. However, a degree provides a head start. Like the college experience, you'll be among peers learning the same subject, which can foster a competitive spirit. A degree also cultivates other essential skills like presentation, communication, and teamwork. These skills are crucial in the professional world.

Moreover, a degree assures employers that you possess the fundamental knowledge, giving you an initial boost. Some employers prefer fresh graduates, while others value real-world experience. It all boils down to your preferred path and your personality. There's no absolute right or wrong in this scenario.
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S.B.’s Answer

First- just look around you for opportunities - your high school probably has activities where you can gain experience and confidence, as well as meeting new people who have diverse interests. Set yourself a goal of trying something new that you're curious about but maybe not sure if you would like.

A college degree is just a tool you can use to earn credentials that will help you with an entry-level job in a field you want to try. There are a very few types of jobs that require a certain college training (for example - medical school will require specific college credits), but most jobs now are open to relevant experience without a degree. Time in college can also give you more opportunities to explore interests, make connections, and try new things without having to support yourself (but remember - those college loans will require years to pay back, so you don't want to take out loans if you don't know why you're there).

Lot of people start businesses or get jobs without a college degree. Many people prefer to work a couple of years and know more about what they want out of college before getting a degree. Don't make the investment in college without knowing what you want from the time and money you will be committing.

Having time for outside interests can be balanced with your college courseload. You can work with a counselor at your college if you are having trouble figuring out how to focus on your courses and take care of other needs. But if your real focus is not on the college classes, perhaps start with what you're interested in to see if it takes you somewhere you want to go.
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Ehab’s Answer

Hello Meme! The key traits of successful individuals include dedication, passion for their work, and a clear vision accompanied by a strategic plan. Begin by identifying what truly excites you, then determine how your skills can align with this passion. Don't be lured into a business solely because of its financial prospects. If your abilities don't match the requirements, it could be challenging to make a profit.

In terms of life beyond academics, engage in clubs that resonate with your interests. This is a fantastic way to build connections outside the workplace.

Obtaining a degree holds significant value in the business world as it demonstrates your ability to set ambitious objectives and your determination to achieve them. Be passionate about your pursuits and strive for your goals! Remember, you have the potential to achieve anything you set your mind to.
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