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Should I go to college or get a job after graduation?

Is it better to go to school after high school or to immediately get a job when i graduate from highschool? I want to be a mechanic when I get older and i dont know.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Ezra’s Answer

There isn't a definitive correct choice. My primary suggestion is to contemplate what would be the most beneficial for your situation. In our modern era, attending college could be a wise decision if it's within your reach, as it can offer you a competitive edge in your professional path. However, it's crucial to remember that college isn't a compulsory route to success. Practical work experience carries equal weight, particularly in fields like mechanics. As a military veteran, I might be a bit biased, but I strongly encourage you to consider a career in the armed forces. The military offers a plethora of roles that can provide you with valuable work experience and even assist with tuition fees while you serve.
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Xiaojie Johan’s Answer

Hi Tom,

If you want to be a mechanic, then a trade school or something that is more suitable to that field is better than college. You don't need to go to college to be a mechanic. If you do want to be in business, to be a teacher or something that requires at least an undergraduate college degree, then you would need to go to college. Sometimes, those professional interests of yours changes so college might be a better fit for you.

Hopefully this helps!

Best regards,

Johan
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Karin’s Answer

Hi Tom,

You got some good advice already. And you have 2 totally viable career paths that you are interested in. You can do one or the other or both together.

I would suggest that you first do an apprenticeship as a car mechanic with a repair shop or maybe with a car manufacturer. That way you'll get a qualification and hands-on experience. If you want to continue on that path you can and maybe work towards having your own shop one day.

If you realize that that's not enough for you, that you want more, you can then go to university and study mechanical engineering. You could continue working (maybe half-time, engineering is no joke) to finance your studies.

Good luck!

KP
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Jerome’s Answer

The answer to this depends on many factors. If you have a home environment that allows you to continue school and save money, I think a degree can hold value. If you don’t have that flexibility or grants/scholarships, you might consider going half time and working part time.

If you want a degree, I think it easier to keep going than to try and go back later.
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Sherita’s Answer

I agree with the other's who have responded. My goddaughter did not attend college immediately after graduation for three reasons. The first was she did not want to go on a basketball scholarship because it was no longer her passion after 14 years of playing in school and in AAU. The second reason was financially. The third reason was she did not know what she would study. This is very normal and I have seen and heard of students pushed into college because of expectations and don't do well once there. My goddaughter joined the National Guard, which is a great option and several parts of the guard you can support. I told her that it will also give her the option to attend college later because National Guard and Military cover a percentage of school finances under the GI bill. So she will have the option to attend and University or Community college to earn a degree in what she decides to study. If this is not the path you'd like to take I would also recommend a trade or a job that offers to covers earning a degree. I work for a telecommunications company and had earned a bachelors degree from a university before joining the company but the company still invest in earing degrees from Associates, Bachelors, Masters and Doctrines that fall with the guidelines of what they will cover and pay for.
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Mahi’s Answer

If you want to be a mechanic I would suggest just starting straight in the field.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Tom !

You basically should only do what your heart and mind tells you to do. But with what you're deciding, you do have a few choices.

One choice would be, and I would advise it, go straight to college and earn a degree in a subject you are interested in. College is not just for a job, it is for personal growth and a special socialization which brings you into contact with many like minded people who may sometimes be important friends that may help your career. You will learn to sharpen your skills, develop viewpoints as you see them and sharpen your already good communication skills both written and verbally. The challenges that college affords you will help you grow as a professional in today's world. College is an amazing personal, social, intellectual experience that can't be compared to other routes. The best part is that you bring your own uniqueness to it !

Your second choice is to do both. Enroll full time in college and work. An ideal situation would be to be a fulltime student and obtain a remote job on line so that you don't have to commute to an outside job. The websites Indeed and Linked In have remote work opportunities. Register at those sites and set notifications for "Remote" and any other preferences of work you'd like. Another way to work while in school full time is to obtain Work Study. A work study job is on campus at any department you may want. You would check Work Study on your financial aid application and when you receive work study, go to your major department or any other place or department on campus and tell them that you're there for a work study job. Both situations allow you to work your own hours around your school schedule.

Your third choice is to work full time and earn an on line degree after high school. That would highly depend on what you wanted to major in. Some degrees go well for the on line format, but some are better in person on campus. You can figure out what you'd like to get your degree in and see if it is one of the many that can be done on line. If you choose this option, remember that on line degrees are serious and just because they are not in person doesn't mean that they are not as challenging with the work. The only difference is that you will not be interacting with classmates and professors in person or have a campus experience. You'd be in the comfort of your own home so on line study is to be taken seriously if you'd like to get the good results in the end.

To decide what you should do, make a check list of the pros and cons of each of the options I've described and see which one fits into what you'd like to do.

As for your aspirations of being a mechanic when you are older, that is a wonderful plan which a college degree would be very helpful for. You would be competitive and experienced through college projects and perhaps be in the top candidates for employment. I have always believed that going straight to college after high school is best because it is the next level of academic growth and should happen with a continual flow. But the decision is yours. You have some choices and know what will work out best for you !

Best wishes to you in all you do and I have left links below to a couple of articles for you !

Michelle recommends the following next steps:

COLLEGE OR WORK ? ? ? https://www.streetdirectory.com/travel_guide/20978/careers_and_job_hunting/college_or_work_after_high_school_tell_me_please.html
TWENTY THREE THINGS TO DO AFTER HIGH SCHOOL https://www.springboard.com/blog/career-advice/things-to-do-after-high-school/
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Patrick’s Answer

Tom, I want to thank you for asking your question. It's clear that many students, like you, are grappling with this same issue, and I hope my response provides some clarity. I want to start by acknowledging the significance of your decision to either pursue higher education or step directly into the job market after high school. It's commendable that you're weighing your options. Let's look at what I believe are the pros of both choices to help you make a decision that aligns with your ambitions.

Opting for college has numerous benefits. Primarily, it offers a guided learning experience that enables you to explore your chosen field in depth. College can also broaden your career prospects by providing a comprehensive education that sharpens your critical thinking and problem-solving abilities. Moreover, many jobs necessitate a degree for entry, and possessing one could boost your income potential in the long run.

Alternatively, joining the workforce right after high school can provide practical, real-world experience. This path allows you to develop valuable skills, particularly if you're interested in a specific trade like auto mechanics. You can start earning income earlier and possibly avoid the burden of student loans.

I believe it's feasible to strike a balance between both options. Given your interest in becoming a mechanic, it's crucial to consider the advantages of technical education programs and apprenticeships. These paths offer specialized training, often blending classroom instruction with practical experience, enabling you to join the job market more swiftly while still acquiring necessary skills.

I would personally suggest researching credible technical schools or apprenticeship programs in your vicinity. Look into their course offerings, connections within the industry, and job placement success. Additionally, try to connect with professionals in the field for insights and advice.

Remember, there's no universal solution. Your choice should resonate with your goals, preferences, and the type of learning environment that suits you best. Whether you decide to attend college or step into the workforce right after high school, both paths can lead to rewarding and successful careers.
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Dan’s Answer

Hi Tom,

You've asked a fantastic question, one that's on the minds of many high school graduates. Your personal circumstances and aspirations are key in determining the best course of action for you. If you're able to land a good job with a company that offers perks like tuition reimbursement, that could be a great route to take. You'd have the opportunity to kickstart your career while also pursuing further education, like a degree or certificate program, supported by your employer. This approach allows you to gain practical work experience while also attending college-level classes.

Alternatively, you could choose to attend college right away and seek part-time work or an internship in your field of interest. I've always believed that gaining hands-on experience in a field you're passionate about can guide you in choosing your future path.

I hope my thoughts provide some guidance as you decide on your next steps.

Best,
Dan
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