7 answers

How helpful is your school’s alumni network in finding a job after graduation?

10
100% of 9 Pros
Asked Viewed 324 times

I can take the proper courses to prepare myself for the job I want. I can get experience. But how do I get set on the proper path? Will the school help me find a good job? Are schools’ alumni more open to hiring recent graduates of their alma mater?
#social-networking #networking #business-networking #buildingrelationships

10
100% of 9 Pros

7 answers

Carol’s Answer

2
100% of 2 Pros
Updated

Businesses often form relationships with a specific college or university, and can offer internships or jobs to candidates from that school. As in all business hiring, relationships and personal connections can be a help, so reaching out to an alumni can be a good way to get the opportunity to interview. After that - its up to you to do your research, show up and give a great resume, and land the position.

Carol recommends the following next steps:

  • Follow your Alumni group on LinkedIn or other social media.
  • Reach out to your college's Alumni Office.
2
100% of 2 Pros

John’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated

The most effective job searches today rely on building a dynamic network of people who believe in you, are willing to assist you and are interested in creating opportunities for you to explore. Quality educational institutions create structures which help you build your network by linking your educational experiences with alumni and friends of the institution for mentoring, internships, networking and employment opportunities.

1
100% of 1 Pros

Kathleen’s Answer

0
Updated

My college alumni was very helpful in my job search, because I went to a large university and immediately joined the alumni association. My school (University of Pittsburgh - Pitt) has regular alumni meetings and game watching parties in major cities, including Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Dallas, New York and Washington DC. During these informal events, I have made numerous contacts, some of which helped me get introduced to hiring managers. BUT you have to do the work of contacting people and making phone calls to get people to take you to the next steps. The contacts can get you an introduction or maybe an interview, but after that, you must prove yourself to the hiring manager in order to get the job.


I have friends that went to other schools who have benefited from a large alumni network as well. Columbia, Penn State, University of Texas, to name a few. These schools also appear to have a very close, friendly alumni who are willing to help other alumni.

Kathleen recommends the following next steps:

  • Us News and World Reports (usnews.com) does a great publication that talks about the top Universities in the United States. They rank them for different majors and based on small vs. large size. They articles will also tell you what the requirements are to get accepted to a particular school. This is a great resource to help you decide where you might go to school.
  • Some universities offer free tests, that help you narrow down what you should major in. These are offered free to high school students as a way to help them decide on going to college. Go online and google a couple of these tests and take them (the FREE ones only). Try https://www.goshen.edu/admissions/2018/01/03/major-quiz/
0

Melissa’s Answer

0
Updated

Hi David, it doesn’t hurt to have a quality network to help land a decent job. If you’re on LinkedIn, LinkedIn notes who in your LinkedIn network are working for a company, which can help in putting your name towards the top of the interviewer list.

0

David’s Answer

0
Updated

Great points above, but another thing when looking into an Alumni network, is where you think you might want to work after school. I had planned to stay in Pennsylvania after my undergrad, and the University of Pittsburgh did a great job of bringing in local companies. However, when I decided to go back to school for my MBA, I wanted a school with a Global brand. So the University of North Carolina was a great opportunity for me. Using resources like The Princeton Review and the U.S. News & World Report can identify which schools have great Alumni networks.

David recommends the following next steps:

  • Think about where you want to work after school
  • Think about the industry too
  • Research alumni networks on-line, like the Princeton Review and U.S. News & World Report
0

Alexandra’s Answer

0
Updated

My school alumni network has been priceless for me since the time I graduated from college until now, when I already have a law degree. I started off as a paralegal in a firm where another alumna of my college worked. I learned more in that firm for a year than I did in all 3 years of law school after that. I formed great personal connections and got career advice. This was my first job after college and it took me on the career path that I am now following. However, even during graduate school I kept receiving advice from my former professors from college and from alumnae as well.

To keep up with a great alumnae network, I would suggest the following steps:

Alexandra recommends the following next steps:

  • Attend alumnae events
  • Find a mentor in a professor or someone who graduated from college before you did
  • Add professionals from your college on LinkedIn
  • Keep in touch (even when you don't need career advice)
  • Give advice to the students who come after you as well, so you can become a mentor.
0

Mona’s Answer

0
Updated

I used to work for a university alumni association and we had a mentor network. Alumni are great to help get used to "informational interviewing" and most will try to be helpful, even if it is simply to introduce you to someone else. They may send your resume along to someone to stay in touch or, some day, you may apply for a position where someone in the organization knows your alumni connection and that personal referral will be helpful. The key is to know how to do informational interviewing==short time request, prepare your 'tell me about yourself and what you want to do' answer, ask questions/let them know you are open to their advice, send a thank you note. Check back in, in 60-90 days and particularly if they helped you get a job or made an introduction. Connect on Linked In. It is one source and most effective in the first year after graduation and, after that, meet them at events and get/stay connected.

0