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What are the most important factors to consider when deciding whether or not to go to graduate school?

I know that some jobs require graduate-level education, but it is also extremely expensive and time-consuming. What are some pros and cons to attending graduate school? What makes the process worth the hassle? #graduateschool #highereducation #graduate-school #higher-education

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Vickey’s Answer

The most important factor in deciding on graduate school, is what you want to do with your life. Many careers only hire people with Master's degrees. You need to research your chosen profession to determine the requirements you need to fulfill to become employable. If your profession doesn't require it, you might not want to go to the next level at this time and pick it up later.

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Brad’s Answer

Personally, I think the best approach is to attend graduate school after obtaining some work experience and going at night so you are not interrupting a career and foregoing income. Some job opportunities require advanced degrees and you may be able to take advantage programs at employers who may cover costs if you maintain certain grades. It shows commitment and can help be a differentiator when competing for jobs.
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Debra’s Answer

The decision to go to grad school can involve many things - finances, priorities, career aspirations just to name a few. Some people can start their career with a bachelor's degree but in order to move up in their chosen field, they need an advanced degree. And believe it or not, some people go to grad school because they like learning - they like being a "student" or they want to develop new skills or to specialize within their chosen field. For most people, it depends on the career they want and what the requirements of that career field are. For example, if your chosen career is to teach college - you're going to need at least a Master's degree and probably a doctorate. And then again, it can depend on specifically what you want to teach . You can teach hairdressing at a post secondary technical college or junior college without a Master's degree. You probably can't be the head of the department though without at least a Master's. Many "professional" careers such as lawyer, doctor, engineer, architect, etc. simply require Masters degrees/professional degrees or higher. Think about the career you want and what it takes to advance/"move-up" in that career. And think about what it might take to "stand out" in a crowd; some people get graduate degrees to make themselves more marketable - not necessarily because it's "required" . Most research indicates that people with advanced degrees make more money, but this varies widely from field to field. So think about your field/career of interest and research it thoroughly. It's always good to talk to people IN the field you're interested in to get good and current information. Here's some more info you may find interesting:


https://www.northeastern.edu/graduate/blog/why-go-to-graduate-school/


https://www.thebalance.com/should-you-go-to-graduate-school-524803


http://gsas.nyu.edu/programs/masters-programs/prospective-students/why-pursue-a-master-s-degree.html

Debra recommends the following next steps:

Read and research thoroughly about the career you want.
Volunteer or intern in your field of interest
Interview people who do what you want to do. Get first-hand info.
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