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What is the workload like? How is the work you do mean to you? Where should I go for good work?

I want to be an electrician, I will work as hard as I can.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Leah’s Answer

I work for a Verizon and my work comes mostly from Engineers in the field. As a former fingerprint tech prior to Verizon I ensure my work is correct from beginning to end. My job entails me update and correct telephone records to ensure all systems are correct. I have 24 years this year and would suggest if you are interested in anything communications that we have great benefits also.
I wish you success in your career!
Peace and Blessings
Leah
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Doc’s Answer

ELECTRICIAN EVALUATION TEST
The entrance evaluation is essentially an aptitude test that helps determine if your ready the role as a electrician. The test is 2.5 hours, contains reading and math, and has a mechanical portion. One of the most common issues from those taking the test is that they weren’t prepared for the algebra in the math portion. That’s why it’s important not only to study basic math, but also understand how it applies in the field such as, how pulleys work and how loads are best distributed.

ATTEND VOCATIONAL OR TRADE SCHOOL
Many vocational or trade schools offer electrician programs. Attending a vocational or trade school program is often the best way to become an electrician. These schools provide hands-on training, which is essential for becoming a successful electrician. They also allow students to learn from experienced professionals in the industry. Vocational and trade schools can be expensive, but they often offer financial assistance options, such as scholarships and loans. Additionally, many employers will reimburse employees who attend a vocational or trade school after being hired.

APPLY FOR ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP
Aspiring candidates must register with a local electrical union or apprenticeship program to operate as licensed electricians. Most electricians work their way through the ranks by starting as registered apprentices in training programs approved by the U.S. Department of Labor and state, county, or city governments. Apprentices undergo safety procedures, electrical theory, first aid practices, and mathematics essential to working in this field. They must also complete a certain number of hours of on-the-job training under supervision from more experienced electricians.
Thank you comment icon I'm excited to put your great advice to good use! Christopher
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