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What degree might help me achieve financial stability sooner?

I am debating between industrial/organizational psychology, business-admin, and Political Science? also which degree might help more once I obtain a bachelors because I do know that for psychology and and political science I might have to further my education after my bachelors but I am just stuck if they are worth pursuing? I want to be able to be financially stable with a healthy personal/work lifestyle first and then continue studying. I have finished all of the pre-req's for these 3 choices with the consideration to the university i would like to transfer but then before applying I looked into nursing for some time and did a couple classes but saw that either way I would be starting form zero and doing more pre-req's that I went back to look into which career to narrow down on and finish before starting something else. I'm hesitant about what to do? any ideas might be nice :)

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Myles’s Answer

Hi Jenny,

Thankfully, all three fields you are studying have the potential to lead you to relatively early career financial stability. By honing in on one of the three fields, ideally which also aligns to what you are more passionate about, combined with good grades, an internship in either your Junior, Senior, or very shortly following graduation, you'll be well positioned to compete in applying for your first job. Specifically in business where I am more familiar, you should expect salary ranges anywhere from $65,000 - $70,000 and upwards of $90,000+ depending on factors including:

1. What college you attended.
2. Specific major (and to a lesser extent, minor).
3. The field/function within the business.
4. What you did in your internship and for how long.
5. Where the company is based - cost of living, etc.

From what I am aware, for political science, I believe the entry level salary is a little less than that of business, and for psychology, it is close to if not a little more than in business fields.

Most importantly, it all comes down to your personal financial management, discipline, and to always live within your means.

Wishing you all the best in completing your schooling and career ahead!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your insight! Jenny
Thank you comment icon You're quite welcome. Myles Wood
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Chloe’s Answer

Hello Jenny!

Instead of focusing solely on the career fields, I suggest you examine the daily tasks involved in those professions. Ask yourself if you're prepared to handle these routine tasks on a daily basis.

Financial stability doesn't solely depend on the career path you choose. It's more about how you handle your finances and comprehend your monetary habits. Living below your means is crucial. For instance, if your annual income is $50,000, you shouldn't live as if you're earning $60,000. Even someone earning $200,000 per year could find themselves living paycheck to paycheck if they adopt a lifestyle that exceeds their income, like living as if they're earning $300,000.

The key is to understand how to manage your finances and to choose a career that brings you satisfaction and happiness every day. Believe it or not, you can have better financial stability with a $40,000 salary than someone earning six figures, all based on how you manage your money.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! I appreciate your response. Jenny
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LaTasha’s Answer

Hello Jenny,

I trust everything is going splendidly for you. I'm in complete alignment with the insights shared earlier, as it's crucial to consider the broader perspective. My academic journey includes a degree in Political Science, followed by a law degree. I've had a diverse range of internships at the state level and even spent a few years working for the state Senate. However, I chose not to make it my lifelong profession, opting instead for a law degree to broaden my horizons. I share this to validate your notion that a Political Science degree often paves the way for further study.

On another note, I've observed the significant impact of industrial/organizational psychology across various sectors. Numerous firms are now introducing wellness benefits to boost employee productivity and foster emotionally supportive work environments. Many of these firms rely on third-party services or consultants to offer services like coaching, counseling, and more. They also leverage this expertise when implementing structural and organizational modifications.

I believe this field holds immense potential and might even spark your interest in launching your own consulting firm. Wellness programs and emphasis on employees' psychological health are becoming standard tools for companies to cultivate a productive work culture. Given the options you've mentioned in your query, I believe this could be an excellent path to explore.

Remember to always follow your passion and manage your finances wisely, no matter what career path you choose. This approach will ensure you find both fulfillment and success in your professional journey.
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Marcus’s Answer

I have a suggestion but also want to challenge you to shift your thought process. First I would recommend that you align the focus with what opportunities the degree provides and if you can see yourself committing to it. For instance I got my degree in Accounting and initially attempted to thrive in that field but it didn't align with my goal nor my personality, so despite the financial opportunities it provided they were in vein b/c I didn't enjoy my job. If you were to look specifically with what would be relevant and financially beneficial I would suggest Engineering and or Computer Science as there will always be a need for these to fields and they are lucrative.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice! Jenny
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Elizabeth’s Answer

Thank you very much Jenny.
I think when choosing a career, the most crucial thing to be considered is "your passion and Enthusiasm" .
Every Course has the Potential of a promising career but it all boils down to the 'passion' of those offering the course. Regardless of how promising a course is, if one has no passion, they won't excel like those with passion and Enthusiasm. If one has passion for a Course, they will be creative and innovative in practicing that course, but if your driving goal is; "How much money you will earn", you will become static(redundant), unhappy and unproductive ,because eventually you will realize that, there is never enough money to satisfy human wants and needs.

Political Science for instance is an Administrative course, and can work in any industry where coordination and administration is needed being a social science course. It is not limited to politics and Diplomacy, that is how promising other Courses are when done with Passion.

So when Choosing a course or career, please consider your Passion, Talent and Skills and how relevant it is to Humanity, by so doing, you will find satisfaction and fulfilment in life. I hope this helps. Thanks
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