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What jobs could I get with a history degree?

History is very interesting, but I can only think of becoming a teacher with a degree in it.

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Terry’s Answer

You are correct. Get the degree, but get it as a second degree. Get your first important what-you-want-to-really-do degree and only THEN get something like a history degree so you can be a teacher at SOME POINT in your life. In other words, get a real job/degree and leave the teaching to struggling artists. You are going to need gobs of money in the future to prepare for your retirement and your health care needs.
Thank you comment icon Alright, thank you so much Isabella
Thank you comment icon Thank you for your perspective, Terry! Teaching varies based on location, who you are teaching, and whether with a school system, organization, or some other capacity. Teaching takes commitment and hard work so it is definitely a real job and not just reserved for struggling artists. There are good points about pursuing what you really want to do and taking lifestyle into consideration. Finances do play a part in that. Lots of things to consider! Sharyn Grose, Admin
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Martina’s Answer

My first professional job after I completed my BA in history was in software development. The company was looking for individuals with college degrees to work in different departments within the organization. I have also worked in administration at a university law school. After holding those positions for a while I decided to go back for a masters degree after which I began teaching at the community college level. I loved it but wanted to work in museums as more informal spaces of learning. I went back to school again for post grad work in museum studies and public history. I have love my experiences and how they have gotten me to where I am now. Professional work, internships added to my education enable me to be the work I do now.
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Isabella
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Danielle’s Answer

I made this mistake. I grew up with a love of history and knew that, while there were options to do other things, the easiest thing to get into with that degeee would be teaching. Teaching is not easy at all. You have to have a passion for kids and all the other things that come with it. I got my history and education degree and never became a teacher.

Jobs you can obtain with a history degree: historian (yes really!), museums (curator, education, collections, archives, conservation, exhibits), libraries, national parks...honestly there's endless possibilities!

As I have gotten more work experience, I see more and more that experience trumps education. Sign up for as much internships and programs as you can. Get experience. Figure out what you like to do (personally I enjoy collections and research over public interactions/education) then you can hone in on where you want to work.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the help! Isabella
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Jerry’s Answer

I noted you asked two separate though related questions. I shall just communicate once. So assume my response covers both of your queries.

My background: Thirty-eight years as a professor of American government and politics and then ten years teaching modern European history (French Revolution and on) to International middle school students (English as their second language).

As a kid I was always interested in history and roamed my local library seeking out anything I could find. At university history was my minor. As a professor my knowledge of history provided all the examples I needed regardless of the American government and politics course I happened to be teaching. And then the middle school students.

I had a wonderful career. And I still read history. Every day. But nothing in particular. History is everywhere.

But here we are in 2024. Read what the others that have responded to you for conformation

If you get into history you will be way behind the curve in today's economic climate.

Everything I read it's tech, science and finance. I just read an article today in a notable newspaper that found individuals who major in humanities not only will earn much less that their contemporaries taking tech, science and finance but may earn less than people who earn a high school diploma and go out and work.

You appear intelligent enough to ask the right questions. Get yourself a marketable education. Hopefully something that interests you. Whatever that may be, a knowledge of its historical background will be quite helpful.

You have some thought to do. Simply asking your question(s) starts you on your way.

And the world of history will still be there regardless of how you earn your keep.
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