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How long have you been in the field of carpentry, and how much and what did you learn from working in the field?

I am a student currently working on getting into the field, so any helpful info would be appreciated.

Thank you comment icon Hi! I am not in the carpentry field, but am a heavy equipment operator of the largest mining equipment in the world, and even though I have been doing it for 11 years, I learn something new every day. It's a wonderful career full of daily challenges and I love it. Find something you love to do, and it won't feel like work. Kathy Kathy Tuccaro
Thank you comment icon Hi friend, Capenter not a hard job but alot of thing you need to learn, and day by day all thing new you need to learn again. Not Carpentry job, every job need to update day by day because Code update everytime and you need to. By the way if you love job you can pass through. Good luck PT Phong Tran

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Charles’s Answer

My one of my first job was helping Mt Farther and brothers to build homes. I was around 13. So I had a early start but unlike my bothers I love to read. And I read everything I could get my hands on. I found that learning the history of a trade really helped me to gain a deeper understanding and how much I had to understand the math.
By the time I was in my 20's I was able to pass the contractors test. I was working in another field by this time. But this allowed me to make exter income. The knowledge I gain in those year severed will as learn new trades .
Some years by I retired at a younger age then most. But soon realized I was getting bored to much. So fell back on my old friend carpentry work and started a handyman company. I really good money doing it and I really could make a lots more but I am retired you know. For how much you can make in this field is and is always going to be up to you. It could be anywhere from $30,000 a year or millions. You could if you really applied yourself, you could your own contractors company. But you can never stop reading and learning. I hope this helps you.

Charles recommends the following next steps:

Try trade school and online training.
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Patrick’s Answer

Firstly, I appreciate your initiative in seeking advice about your interest in carpentry. I trust the insights I'm about to share, garnered from my personal experience, will be of some assistance to you.

I've been fortunate to have my father-in-law as my mentor in carpentry. He taught me everything from building cabinets and tables to constructing speaker housings. One vital lesson I've learned is the significance of meticulousness and precision in every facet of carpentry. Whether it's accurate measurements, careful assembly, or the final finishing touches, precision is key to ensure the quality and durability of the end product. This attention to detail not only results in superior work but also enhances the safety and lifespan of the structures created.

Furthermore, my journey in carpentry has instilled in me the importance of problem-solving and adaptability in overcoming any hurdles or unexpected issues that arise. Carpentry projects often necessitate innovative solutions and quick thinking to tackle problems as they emerge. Be it modifying plans on the spot, resolving structural concerns, or improvising with materials, effective problem-solving is a crucial skill for success in carpentry.

Moreover, the sense of satisfaction derived from seeing the tangible results of one's labor is a unique aspect of carpentry. Crafting something with your own hands, whether it's a custom piece of furniture, an elegantly constructed staircase, or a meticulously built house, imbues a sense of pride and achievement that is truly rewarding.

As for your journey into carpentry, I can't stress enough the importance of gaining practical experience and learning from seasoned professionals. While formal education and training programs offer a strong foundation in carpentry principles and techniques, nothing can replace the hands-on experience gained through apprenticeships, internships, or on-the-job training. I encourage you to seize opportunities to work with skilled carpenters, absorb their expertise, and practice refining your skills in real-world situations.

Additionally, safety should be your top priority in all your work. Carpentry can be physically challenging and potentially dangerous, so it's crucial to follow safety guidelines, use suitable personal protective equipment, and be aware of potential risks at the job site. Investing in safety training and certifications will equip you with the knowledge and skills needed to prioritize safety and prevent workplace accidents or injuries.

In summary, my years in carpentry have taught me invaluable lessons about precision, problem-solving, craftsmanship, and safety. As you step into the world of carpentry, I urge you to seize opportunities for hands-on experience, learn from seasoned professionals, prioritize safety, and foster a love for craftsmanship and excellence in your work. Carpentry is a gratifying profession, and with dedication, persistence, and a commitment to continuous learning, you can craft a successful and fulfilling career in this age-old trade.
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Yvonne’s Answer

Start getting familiar with all the carpentry tools out there. Have a pencil and paper when you go be a helper for a carpenter or anyone in construction as they will most likely do light carpentry at the very least. I love Capentry in general, because it is where you can see how meticulous and crafty a person can be; I'm a kitchen and bathroom designer and rely heavily on skilled carpenters to bring my kitchen and bathroom design ideas to life. I would also recommend you volunteer at habitat for humanity or any community construction project. Learn about the tools needed, learn about how things are cut, crown moldings are difficult, but a great carpenter will always make the moldings looks like they were built out of one piece.
As a carpenter you will find that you can work for yourself, or as a valuable employee in a variety of fields. including of course construction, residential and commercial work, you can become a finish carpenter (Someone who does very meticulous and detailed work) I also recommend you reach out to trades in the construction industry to ask about internship opportunities, and apprenticeships. there is an association that labels themselves, "Bring back the trades" because in construction one thing we can all agree on, is that there aren't enough skilled workers. So it's great that you want to be a carpenter.
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