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What should i do if i want to major in chemical engineering but the university im planning to go to doesn’t offer said program. I was thinking of majoring in materials science and engineering and getting a minor in chemistry. Could that potentially land me any chemical engineering jobs, or should I reconsider what im planning to do?

Hello! Im in 11th grade and absolutely love both engineering and chemistry.

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Karin’s Answer

Hi Zaid,

I am a bit puzzled why you need to go to a university that doesn't offer chem. eng. when you very much want to study chem. eng? Why not go to a university that offers chem. eng? You are in Florida? University of Florida offers chem. eng. (and materials science).

Materials science and engineering is also a perfectly wonderful major. If you are planning on getting a graduate degree, i.e. masters and/or PhD, it's also a good basis to get into graduate school for chemical engineering.

If you want to go to industry after your bachelors, they would probably prefer chemical engineers if they are looking for chem eng. You can improve your chances by getting some hands-on experience doing internships or a summer job. Make connections early and network.

If the chemistry department offers courses in industrial chemistry, make sure to take those. You need to learn about energy balances and materials balances among other things. Also physical chemistry is important. Some industry-focused certificates might also be helpful.

I hope this helps a bit! Good luck!

KP
Thank you comment icon Agree with Karin. If you want to be a Chemical Engineer you need a degree in Chemical Engineering . You need to go to a school that has a chemical engineering program. Michael Trocchia
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Antigone’s Answer

1st question: Can you share your reasons for choosing this particular university?

2nd question: Can you articulate your understanding of the role of a chemical engineer? (Please pay special attention to this, as many people often misunderstand this profession)

In essence, if you're fascinated by processes, specifically the machinery used to process chemicals, then degrees in chemical, electrical, or mechanical engineering could be your stepping stones. The crucial question here is, do you truly understand what a chemical engineer does? I strongly encourage you to research this thoroughly. A fantastic resource for gaining insights into the actual job responsibilities is job advertisements. Observe what tasks are expected of a chemical engineer and what other degrees are considered suitable.

Additionally, I recommend beginning your journey at a local community college. Explore the engineering and engineering technology courses they offer. This could provide an opportunity to start gaining practical experience in the field sooner rather than later, which is invaluable for a future career in engineering.
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Tammy’s Answer

As Karin said, it is not wise to select a college that does not offer the major you wise to study. It sounds like you have a really good idea of what you want to do in life so do yourself the favor of selecting the best college to set yourself up to be successful in your future career- one that has your major. I know students choose their college based on a variety of reasons and selection factors. Is there another university that will meet your same selection criteria but also includes your intended major? Use the end of your junior year here to do some additional college research looking at only those universities that have your major. Talk to your school counselor, visit a college fair, research online, take some trips around Florida this summer to do some campus visits and/or consider going away to college. There are many values in going to college beyond your future career but at the end of the day the purpose of that degree is to set you up for your future career.
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Mary’s Answer

The smartest move for you would be to switch to a different college that provides the major you're passionate about. Once you complete your undergraduate degree in a relevant subject, like chemistry, you should consider internships, volunteer roles, or jobs that offer experience in your desired field. This will enhance your appeal to future employers.
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