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how to study different topics?

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Aneesa’s Answer

In my own experience, during my formative years, I was often encouraged to jot down key points while studying. This strategy turned out to be incredibly beneficial for me. I made my own 'study guide' during my study sessions. This guide was filled with bullet points summarizing the material I was learning, which I would then use as a quick reference right before an exam. This method significantly boosted my academic performance.
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Joanna’s Answer

Hi Julis,

It could be good to start with focusing on one topic at the time. If you study several subjects at the same time, you might get confused or distracted easily. You can merge similar or interconnected topics together (e.g. related history and literature, mathematics and physics), but I would suggest to avoid hopping from one subject to another at the same time.

It is a good rule of thumb, to check different resources, both physical, like books and digital, like e-books, online publications, videos. Personally I find very useful speaking/meeting directly with a knowledgeable person and attend or watch meetings/presentations/programs about a topic that interests me.

Lastly, if you have a lot of difficult topics to learn, a good idea might be, to write them all down, and then start a bullet list, where you can break down each topic into manageable steps. Focus on specific subtopics, one at the time, review what you learned, after each bullet point you've reached.
Then take a break, stretch, do something to relax, and reward yourself. Then you are ready to start the next point. When you end the entire chapter/topic, review again all the points. Check if you think you feel you need to repeat a step.
Once one topic is completed, and you feel confident about it, you can move the the next one.
If you think you might need more time for one topic, to really feel confident with the subject, you could proceed with the next topic, and review the one you need more time to focus on, once you will have some spare time. But you will anyway have already an overall knowledge, as you have spent time on it, and break it down to steps you can easily review.

If you are interested also in how to memorize the topics you are learning, then I would invite you to check, what is the best mnemotechnic for you. There are many, and every one of us being different, will find useful different ones.
Here is a resource about the subject and the definition of it:
- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_of_memory
- https://www.studysmarter.co.uk/magazine/mnemotechnics/

Also, it is very important, in my opinion, to find what surrounding suites you best while studying. Some people need complete silence, some focus best with some music playing in the background, some need a very bright and open space, some prefer to study in a room, with a good lamp.
It is all something you might want to experiment with, to find out your optimal way of learning.
Please remember, there is no one solution fits all, so feel free to question my or any other approach, on your journey to find the best one for you.
Wishing you to memorize everything you need, be able to put it into action, and pass smoothly any exam you might need to prepare for!
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