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Will Failing grades harm your chance at getting a job?

Im 16 and im in 8th grade and I've recently been doing online schooling. It's really not my thing and im back to regular school now but I've failed my grade twice and ive been panicking a lot about it. I've always had good grades and im afraid i wont get a job later on now that ive failed more than once.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Xavier’s Answer

Hello Lani! First, I commend your bravery for asking such a significant question. Remember, there's no need to worry - time is your ally. We all grow and develop at our own pace, and each of us has unique strengths and challenges. Traditional learning can sometimes be tough, but it's all part of the journey. My initial advice for you is to concentrate on yourself. Take some time to jot down the factors that are influencing your life - parents, friends, and various distractions such as internet, TV, music, and other hobbies. These elements are part of what makes you unique. It's not about eliminating these things, unless they are harmful, but rather about organizing and reducing. Prioritize the aspects that propel you forward and always be mindful of the intentions of those around you. Limit interactions that don't contribute to your progress. Sometimes, friends might seek validation and acceptance through association, which could lead to them using your time for their own benefit, without considering your best interests.

We understand that passive activities like watching TV and listening to music have their limitations, but they are also part of our lives and we enjoy them. Try to limit your time spent on these activities. Parents or guardians can sometimes add to the confusion and chaos. However, remember that their advice and guidance come from a place of love and care for you. Even if their communication style isn't what you're used to or comfortable with, their influence is valuable and should be considered.

As young people, it's easy to feel misunderstood or believe that those we care about don't understand or want the best for us. This is where emotional intelligence comes into play, surpassing any knowledge you could gain from a book or online course. Strive to understand and listen. Ask probing questions to understand the motives behind the actions and advice of those around you.

Firstly, establish a list of your top priorities. What are your goals? List them in order of importance (try to keep this list concise). Whenever you face a tough decision, ask yourself, will this bring me closer to my goal? If the answer is no, then it's time to move on. True friends will understand and support your decisions, and if they don't, it might be time to reassess those relationships.

Next, set a schedule for your desired activities. You don't have to eliminate anything, just ensure your schedule is balanced, with your key priorities getting the most attention. Don't forget to allocate time for rest - a good night's sleep is crucial. Staying up until the early hours can disrupt your biological clock, which could affect your performance the next day.

Lastly, identify the people who value your success the most. Dedicate most of your time to these individuals and limit your interaction with those who might not have your best interests at heart. You don't have to cut anyone off (unless their behavior is detrimental to your goals), just prioritize your time wisely.

Remember, you've got this! There's no set timeline for success - we all progress at our own speed. The key is to ensure personal growth, prioritize those who help us move forward, and limit interactions that don't contribute to our progress. You've got this! Devise your plan and stick to it!

Excelsior!
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Lani
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Lani,

Will Failing grades harm your chance of getting a job?

Failing grades during your academic career can indeed have an impact on your future job prospects, but it is not necessarily a definitive barrier to employment. Here are some key points to consider:

1. Education vs. Skills and Experience: While having good grades can be beneficial when applying for jobs, especially in competitive fields or industries that require specific academic qualifications, many employers also value practical skills and relevant work experience. Demonstrating your abilities through internships, projects, extracurricular activities, or certifications can sometimes outweigh the significance of grades.

2. Growth Mindset and Learning from Failure: Experiencing failure academically can be a valuable learning opportunity. It can teach resilience, perseverance, and the importance of seeking help when needed. Employers often appreciate candidates who have faced challenges, learned from them, and emerged stronger as a result.

3. Explaining Academic Challenges: If you have faced academic setbacks like failing grades, it is essential to be honest about them during job interviews or in your resume if required. You can use these experiences to showcase how you overcame obstacles, developed new study habits, sought support from teachers or mentors, or even changed your approach to learning.

4. Seeking Support and Guidance: If you are struggling academically or feeling overwhelmed by the pressure of schoolwork, it is crucial to reach out for help. School counselors, teachers, tutors, or educational support services can provide assistance and guidance to improve your academic performance.

5. Alternative Paths and Opportunities: It’s important to remember that there are various pathways to success beyond traditional academic achievements. Vocational training programs, apprenticeships, entrepreneurship, creative pursuits, or other non-traditional routes can lead to fulfilling careers without solely relying on academic grades.

In conclusion, while failing grades may present challenges in securing certain types of jobs that require specific academic credentials, they do not necessarily define your entire career trajectory. Employers look for a combination of skills, experiences, attitude, and potential when hiring candidates.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used in Answering this Question:

Harvard Business Review: The Harvard Business Review provides insights into hiring practices and trends in the job market based on research and expert opinions.

Forbes: Forbes is a reputable source for career advice and articles on professional development that offer perspectives on how academic performance relates to employability.

U.S. News & World Report: U.S. News & World Report offers rankings and guides related to education and careers that can provide valuable information on the importance of academic performance in the job market.

These sources were consulted to ensure accuracy and reliability in addressing the question about the impact of failing grades on future job opportunities.

GOD BLESS YOU!
JC.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for giving me advice. Lani
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Gary’s Answer

Lani,

The road ahead of you is brimming with opportunities for growth and success. The fact that you're seeking advice already shows your determination to rise above past setbacks. Remember, your journey towards landing your dream job is a marathon, not a sprint. It's highly probable that your first job won't be your last.

Each role you undertake is a chance to shine, to display your strong work ethic, your ability to collaborate effectively with others (even those who might be challenging), and to prove your worth as a vital part of any team. Over time, these achievements and the skills you gain will overshadow any academic struggles you faced in the past, like those 8th-grade grades.

Give it your all, and success will surely follow!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Gary. Lani
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Melissa’s Answer

Lani,

Your honesty and openness in asking this question are truly appreciated. I want to reassure you that in my entire life, not a single employer has ever asked about my high school GPA. Yes, it does play a role when applying for colleges, but remember, there's a vast array of colleges and opportunities waiting for you.

Don't be too hard on yourself. We all learn at different speeds and in different ways. Some of the most brilliant minds didn't excel in high school but went on to achieve remarkable success and wealth.

Start by setting achievable goals and stick to them. Discover what you're passionate about, be it a hobby or a niche, and then focus on honing that skill. Develop it to the best of your ability.

By doing this, I guarantee you'll thrive!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Lani
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Colleen’s Answer

It depend on the role, if you are taking a course that is directly correlated to the role then yes. It is not always required to provide your gpa or transcripts, unless you prefer to.
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Gina’s Answer

Failing grades in middle school or even high school do not necessarily have a significant impact on your chances of getting a job later on. While academic performance is important, employers typically focus more on your skills, experience, and qualifications relevant to the job you are applying for.

Here are a few points to consider:

1. Focus on improvement: Employers value individuals who demonstrate growth and a willingness to learn from their experiences. If you have struggled academically in the past, focus on improving your grades and showing a positive trajectory in your academic performance.

2. Develop other skills: While grades are one aspect of your academic record, they do not define your entire skill set. Use your time in school to develop other skills and strengths, such as leadership, communication, problem-solving, teamwork, or creativity. These skills can be valuable assets in the job market.

3. Gain practical experience: Look for opportunities to gain practical experience outside of the classroom. This can include internships, part-time jobs, volunteering, or extracurricular activities. Practical experience can demonstrate your abilities, work ethic, and commitment to personal growth.

4. Highlight achievements and strengths: When applying for jobs in the future, focus on highlighting your achievements, strengths, and relevant experiences. Emphasize your skills, accomplishments, and any certifications or awards you have earned. This can help offset any concerns about past academic performance.

5. Pursue further education or training: If you are concerned about your academic record, consider pursuing further education or training after high school. This can include vocational programs, trade schools, community college, or university. Obtaining additional qualifications can demonstrate your commitment to learning and enhance your job prospects.

Remember, everyone faces challenges and setbacks at some point in their academic journey. Failing grades in middle school or even high school do not define your future success. Focus on your personal growth, continue to work hard, and explore opportunities to develop your skills and experiences. With determination and a proactive mindset, you can still achieve your career goals.
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Lani
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Leonidas’s Answer

Really depends on the type of job you are going after.

If it is an office environment, the employee would definitely take your grades into consideration since that is the short amount of time he has to evaluate your potential performance.

However, if you are interested in trade skills, this should not matter much but rather the commitment you are willing to put into your craft.
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Romir’s Answer

Hi Lani, I definitely understand the panic you're feeling, but rest assured failing a class in 8th grade will not dictate your future. What's more important is understanding why you didn't perform like you usually do, and identifying the proper steps in fixing it for next time.

For example:
Were there specific topics that you may have understood less than others? It may be worth devoting some time to identifying those areas and spending more time trying to fill in your gaps of understanding.

When you take notes in class, are they helpful when you look back in your study process? Most teachers are very conscious about making sure they cover all exam topics in class, so it could be a matter of adjusting your note taking technique.

If you need extra help, don't be afraid to talk to the teacher directly! I can't speak for all teachers, but most of them genuinely want to help their students. If they see you making the effort to learn their topics and reach out for help when you don't understand something, they will be more than happy to help.

I hope you take these points under consideration, but remember, a failed class at your point in life does not define you! Just focus on your own improvement one step at a time. Wishing you the best of luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your help! I will keep this in mind Lani
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Jerome’s Answer

I agree with others. Life can be messy and your grades don't have to have a significant impact on your future.

Your GPA can impact the types of colleges you get into, but ultimately people will stop asking about your GPA and just accept that you have a degree. Keep focused and put in the effort, because you are investing in your future, but be kind and patient to yourself as well.
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Megan’s Answer

Lani- do not worry! Your grades in 8th grade do not matter!

In high school, you start with a fresh GPA and you can continue working hard to maintain a high GPA.

I will tell you a secret- I failed a class in college and now I have my Masters. It happens- it is OK! You can always retake courses.

My husband who is now an Occupational Therapist did not get the grade he needed in his Chemistry course but retook it and got the grade and got accepted into OT school.

Failing one class will not stop you from getting a good job!

Forgive yourself, and remember you are smart!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Even though I'm still a bit panicked about the failing, this helps a lot! Lani
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