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Does your career feel as rewarding as you thought when you went to school for the certifications required to work in this position ?

Do you feel as though you can reach and help people on a personal level while completing the requested jobs?

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William’s Answer

Hello William!

In short, yes. It absolutely feels as though I can reach and help people on a personal level. Though, I have found that such connections and feelings can grow less common the more big picture one's career becomes. Especially when you are working with (and classifying people as) entire "populations" as opposed to individuals more one-on-one.

My biggest recommendation is this, however. Be careful when setting your expectations for any given career field or work space when initially going in. Every work culture is different and whether or not the values/mission are truly reflected through action can vary from place to place. So try to be cautious about making any sweeping generalizations. :)
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, William !

I went to college for a degree in Theatre with an emphasis on Acting, so yes, every time I work on a project I apply everything I learned in college. It also prepared my awareness of collaboration and gave me some life skills which have never left me as decades have gone by. It's the type of career that, as time goes on, you have the luxury of drawing upon life experience, too. It was and is everything I expected and hoped it would be, but I had formed a good mind set about it and my intent was doable and realistic.

As an actor, you do feel part of a team that is making a difference, reaching people with a message, information, entertainment, thought provoking stories. That's the whole purpose of it. I can't tell you how many times through the duration of a show or project the cast and crew felt almost like a family. So I did gain much from what I learned for my Bachelors Degree and my formal and informal education greatly helps me professionally as well as personally.
Thank you comment icon You rock! This advice is very helpful. William
Thank you comment icon I am happy to give advice ! Have a great day, William ! Michelle M.
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Olia’s Answer

Well I suppose when I completed my bachelor I did not have any idea that I will work in a office. Although, my life changed at all and I had to do this in order to make my ends meet. One advice from is that nothing is so dreamy but you can choose the way that you will work and perhaps the sector to be interesting for you and not boring. Last but not least If I had to be again a student I would look my strengths carefully and the market needs in order to choose something which will contain something from my wants something from my abilities and to be in demand,
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. William
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Maya’s Answer

I would say that my career has felt very rewarding, but not necessarily in all of the same ways I might have thought it would be as a student. Over the course of my career, I found that my interests and priorities continued to change and evolve. The specific skills and topics I studied as an undergraduate (Government and Middle Eastern Studies) and in graduate school (MBA) have at times been directly applicable to my work, and at other times have been more indirectly relevant. For example, I learned strong writing skills, which have been valuable in every single role no matter the topic. With every career change, even if the specific industry shifted from what I had expected as a student, my focus on communities and social impact stayed the same. As a result, I do feel like my roles have been fulfilling and rewarding on a personal level, because the outputs from my job and my team are in some way tied to community impact.
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Stephen’s Answer

Absolutely, I agree with you! But let's remember, in our lives and careers, there are elements we can steer and others that are beyond our control. This could be unexpected events, good or bad, or simply being at the right spot at the right moment, or not.

Stephen recommends the following next steps:

I would focus on what has gone well, and where you can course correct.
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Nandishkumar’s Answer

Drawing from my rich tapestry of experiences spanning over 20 years across diverse environments and nations, I'm excited to share some nuggets of wisdom on what makes a career genuinely fulfilling:

Attitude is Everything:
The cornerstone of a satisfying career is the right attitude. Success isn't just about bagging titles or certificates; it's about perpetual growth and transformation. Welcome challenges as stepping stones to learn and enhance yourself. As the renowned motivational guru Zig Ziglar wisely expressed, “Your attitude, not your aptitude, will determine your altitude.” Nurture an attitude that's resilient, optimistic, and eager for fresh experiences.

Embrace Change:
Being adaptable is another secret to a gratifying career. Our world is in a constant state of flux, and so are industries and job roles. Be open-minded towards change and ready to adjust. This adaptability lets you switch gears when needed, seize fresh opportunities, and stay current in your profession. Bruce Lee's insightful words, “Be like water making its way through cracks,” underscore the significance of adaptability. By staying flexible, you can steer your way through any career terrain successfully.

Never Stop Learning and Trying New Things:
Always keep your curiosity alive and be ready to try new things. The most accomplished professionals are those who never stop seeking knowledge and aren't scared to venture into the unknown. Lifelong learning keeps you at the forefront and fuels innovation in your role. Trying new things can lead to breakthroughs and enhancements that set you apart. As Albert Einstein wisely noted, “Once you stop learning, you start dying.” Make it a habit to consistently invest in your personal and professional growth.

Make a Difference:
To answer your query about influencing and assisting others on a personal level, I can confidently say that the most gratifying moments in my career have been those where I've made a positive impact in someone's life. Whether it's coaching a new team member, guiding a team to victory, or introducing a solution that brings positive change for clients, these personal interactions and contributions are profoundly rewarding. By focusing on the human side of your work, you'll discover greater fulfillment and purpose.

To sum it up, a fulfilling career is built on a resilient attitude, adaptability, and a commitment to lifelong learning and exploration. Always strive to make a personal difference through your work. While certifications and titles have their place, it's the ongoing journey of growth, adaptability, and meaningful connections that truly make a career worthwhile.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the wise words, they are greatly appreciated :) William
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Linda’s Answer

When I was in highschool is when I became acutely aware of my insabsble desire towards design and became driven. The thing about being driven by a need in your head is you are alone in the journey to reach the particular goal. I became self absorbed and unaware I was for a long time most of my energy was focused on little else which isn't so good for the other people on your life. So yes my career has been extremely rewarding but mostly when I reached my goals and stopped,looked around and realized how much I loved what I do, how lucky I have been in my quest that I needed to open up and receive the accolades and praise and yes rewards, which has been many. So enjoy the ride of your life and relise your career is a huge part of a happy life spent, really the ultimate goal!!!
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Nicholas’s Answer

Absolutely, the answer is a resounding Yes. Remember, it's natural for your enthusiasm to wane in your current role or industry after being in your career for a while. The key is to continually challenge yourself and evaluate what brings you joy. Reflect on whether you enjoy the tasks you undertake and the colleagues you interact with. If you find that your role is no longer fulfilling, the best course of action is to transition into a role that brings you satisfaction.

Your educational qualifications and certifications have equipped you with a versatile skill set that can open doors to diverse opportunities. Moreover, never halt your learning journey. As you gain more knowledge, you'll find yourself eager to take on more responsibilities. For instance, I initially thought my calling was Computer Programming, but I now find myself thriving in Product Management, and prior to that, I was immersed in Project Management. Whenever I sense my interest dwindling, I switch up my role, which usually reignites my passion.

I would encourage you to explore a field you're passionate about and then reassess your feelings after gaining a few years of experience.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! William
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