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Where do I start to be a nurse ?

I am going to be a freshman in college

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Subject: Career question for you

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Hailey’s Answer

It sounds as thought you already have plans to start school. Speak with an academic advisor at the college to find which specific prerequisites you’d need for this program. Once you complete these and take a placement test you should be able to enter a program. Complete the nursing program and then get permission to take the NCLEX from the respective nursing board. After passing, you’ll have a license.
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Martin’s Answer

To begin your journey in nursing, you'll first need to apply to a nursing school program. This might involve fulfilling some prerequisites and undergoing certain tests, or you could jump straight into their nursing program where they'll guide you through the required curriculum. The process is quite straightforward, and your main decision is how you'd like to start. You have the option to begin with a 2-year program and then switch to a bachelor's degree, or you can dive right into a bachelor's degree program from the get-go. The challenging part might be getting accepted into a program, as the field has become quite competitive. But don't worry, with determination and hard work, you'll make it!
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Wayne’s Answer

Hi Ashley. Aspiring nurses in college have several exciting paths to pursue their passion. Here’s a comprehensive guide to navigate this journey:

1. Choose Your Nursing Degree:
- Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN): This two-year program prepares you for entry-level positions as a Registered Nurse (RN). It’s a faster and more affordable option, ideal for those seeking immediate career entry.
- Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN): This four-year program offers a broader and more theoretical foundation, preparing you for leadership roles, advanced practice, and graduate studies. It’s becoming the preferred pathway for many employers.

2. Fulfill Prerequisite Courses:
- Science: Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, Chemistry
- Mathematics: Statistics, College Algebra
- English: Composition, Literature
- Social Sciences: Psychology, Sociology

3. Meet Admission Requirements:
- High School Diploma or Equivalent: Maintain a good GPA.
- Standardized Tests: Achieve required scores on exams like the SAT/ACT.
- Letters of Recommendation: Obtain positive references from teachers, counselors, or employers.
- Personal Statement: Express your passion for nursing and highlight relevant experiences.

4. Navigate the Application Process:
- Research and Apply to Nursing Schools: Choose accredited programs that fit your needs and goals.
- Prepare for Interviews: Practice your responses and showcase your communication skills.

5. Complete Your Nursing Program:
- Coursework: Immerse yourself in theoretical knowledge and practical skills.
- Clinical Rotations: Gain hands-on experience in diverse healthcare settings.
- Pass the Licensure Exam (NCLEX-RN): This national exam allows you to practice as an RN.

Additional Tips:
- Gain Healthcare Experience: Volunteer at hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes.
- Develop Transferable Skills: Communication, critical thinking, teamwork, and problem-solving are crucial.
- Network with Professionals: Attend events, join nursing organizations, and connect with nurses on LinkedIn.
- Take Advantage of Resources: Utilize campus career services, academic advisors, and online resources.
- Remember, this is just a starting point. The path to becoming a nurse is dynamic, and individual journeys may differ. Be prepared for challenges, stay motivated, and keep your long-term goals in mind.

Here are some resources to help you on your journey:
- National League for Nursing: https://www.nln.org/
- American Nurses Association: https://www.nursingworld.org/
- National Council of State Boards of Nursing: https://www.ncsbn.org/

Good luck!
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Erin Lee’s Answer

Ashley,
Working with your advisor may also be helpful. Your advisor should be able to assist you with your class schedule so that you take all the appropriate pre-nursing courses required. A degree in nursing has a lot of specific coursework and pre-requisites. So making sure the classes you take are the right ones and are scheduled to get you to the nursing coursework on time. Nursing programs may have application processes and deadlines so you want to be sure you meet the requirements to apply.
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