Skip to main content
6 answers
6
Asked 406 views

is it possible to make the army a permeant job instead of something ill do for like 20 years i dont really fit well in civilian life so i want to know if i can make the millitary a career instead of just another job ill do in my life?

i dont really like working as a civilian it was boring n mind numbing slow for me n the pay was garbage n i was always treated like the outcast cuz i was the "new guy"

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

6 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Michael’s Answer

Ok. Go ENLIST.

Do your job, stay fit, train hard, and you'll succeed in the Army for 20-30 years.
When you retire from that, come back as a DOD Contractor for another 20-30 years, doing much the same job.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

David’s Answer

"i dont really like working as a civilian it was boring n mind numbing slow for me n the pay was garbage n i was always treated like the outcast cuz i was the "new guy"

I've served myself and I have a few Military Retirees in my family. You can absolutely make the Military a Career. Yet understand that the military is a commitment, a literal contract you sign. And many benefits do come along with this. Yet it can also be boring... You'll learn meaning of the phrase "Hurry up and wait!" very quickly. Not sure of the pay now, but as PFC years ago, it was pretty low compared to the outside world. This is partly due to the fact that Army is boarding, feeding, training, and clothing you while your there. And you won't always be assigned to same unit forever, you may have to do hardship tours in places that are not all that exciting. So being the new guy or the replacement is also a part of what you'll encounter. If joining enlisted you are at the bottom of the totem pole, and VERY often you will be told what to do. And please understand whether it's civilian or military life, you will have to be social and get along with people. You will absolutely need this in both military and civilian life for success.

I applaud a decision to make the military a career, yet understand it will not necessarily solve problems of boredom or feeling like an outcast if these are the only reasons your joining. You have to have a goal.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Connor,

Is it possible to make the military a permanent career?

Yes, it is possible to make the military a permanent career. The military can be a fulfilling and long-term career choice for many individuals. The U.S. military offers various benefits, including competitive pay, comprehensive healthcare, education assistance, and retirement plans. Moreover, the military provides opportunities for professional growth and skill development, leading to a successful and rewarding career.

Benefits of a Military Career

The U.S. military offers several benefits that make it an attractive career option:

Competitive Pay: Military salaries are competitive with civilian jobs, especially when considering the additional benefits provided. Basic pay is based on rank and years of service, and there are also special pays and bonuses for specific duties or hazardous assignments.

Healthcare Coverage: Active-duty military members have access to comprehensive healthcare coverage through TRICARE, which includes medical, dental, and vision services. There are also programs for family members and retirees.

Education Assistance: The military offers several education assistance programs, such as the Tuition Assistance program (TA), which pays up to 100% of tuition costs for eligible service members pursuing college degrees or vocational certifications. Additionally, the Post-9/11 GI Bill provides education benefits to eligible veterans and their family members.

Retirement Plans: The military retirement plan is a defined benefit plan that provides a guaranteed monthly income for life after 20 years of service. This is in addition to the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP), which is a 401(k)-style defined contribution plan with government matching contributions.

Professional Development: The military offers numerous opportunities for professional growth and skill development through on-the-job training, leadership courses, and specialized schools. These experiences can translate into valuable civilian credentials and make military veterans highly sought after by employers in various industries.

Making the Military a Permanent Career

To make the military a permanent career, consider the following steps:

Research Branches: Research the different branches of the military (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) to determine which one aligns best with your interests, skills, and long-term career goals. Each branch has its own unique culture and opportunities; therefore, it is essential to find the right fit for you.

Join as an Officer or Enlisted Member: You can join the military as an officer or enlisted member. Officers typically hold leadership positions and require a four-year college degree or higher; enlisted members start at lower ranks and receive on-the-job training in specific fields or occupations. Consider your educational background and career aspirations when deciding between these two options.

Demonstrate Commitment: To advance in your military career and achieve long-term success, demonstrate commitment by excelling in your duties, volunteering for additional responsibilities, seeking promotions, and maintaining positive relationships with your colleagues and superiors. This commitment will not only benefit your military career but also increase your competitiveness for post-military employment opportunities when you decide to transition back to civilian life.

Plan for Transition: While making the military a permanent career is possible, it’s essential to plan for transition back to civilian life eventually—whether that’s after 20 years of service or upon retirement from active duty due to injury or other circumstances beyond your control. Prepare by researching available resources (e.g., Transition Assistance Program (TAP), American Corporate Partners), networking with industry professionals in your desired field(s), obtaining relevant certifications or licenses during your military service if possible (e.g., Project Management Professional (PMP), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)), and maintaining an updated resume throughout your career to reflect accomplishments and skills acquired during your time in the service..

In conclusion, making the military a permanent career is not only possible but can be an incredibly rewarding experience both personally and professionally—especially if you take advantage of available resources throughout your service years to prepare yourself for future employment opportunities upon transitioning back into civilian life.. With dedication, hard work, adaptability ,and strategic planning ,you can enjoy a long-lasting ,successful ,and fulfilling miliary carrer .

God Bless,
JC.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jessica’s Answer

Yes, its possible to make the Army (or any other branch of the military) into a career path. You'll just keep signing contracts to stay in.

However, don't discount the experience and skills you'll make while in the military too. It may change you in such a way that after 4 or 6 years, you are ready for civilian life again. And with being a veteran, there are a lot of avenues that will open up for you such as school, or specific transition training that could help you.

I would recommend making sure you get into a job sector of the Army that you enjoy. Like cooking, look into being a Food service specialist. Enjoy building things? Look at Food service specialist.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice. connor
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ryan’s Answer

Hey Connor. Thanks for your interest in a military career. As others have said, yes, you can make the military a career. Traditionally military retirements occur between 20 and 30 years of service, but there are a lot of factors that go into this. If you're still young when you "retire" from the military, many military retirees find jobs with military defense contractors doing similar work to what they did on active duty.

That said, I just wanted to share a few thoughts about the justification you shared.

1). The military can also definitely be "mind-numbingly boring" as well. Especially depending on your MOS (job). If you sign up for the infantry thinking it will be nothing but breaking stuff and killing bad guys, you'll be disappointed, because unless you're deployed, you're going to be doing a lot of inventorying gear, cleaning stuff, working out, standing watch, etc. It's not Call of Duty everyday. My advice would actually be to pick a job that may not sound exciting but has a never-ending workload to keep you busy in peacetime and wartime (i.e. Aircraft maintenance, medical assisting, intelligence, etc.)

2). Military pay can also be "garbage". There are a lot of benefits like free healthcare, tuition assistance, tax-free allowances, etc., but you will never get rich from a military career, especially as an enlisted soldier/sailor/marine/airmen.

3) You will frequently be the "new guy" in the military too, especially if you become an officer. In my 4-years on active duty I moved 5 times (including my deployment). Within my primary duty station where I spent 3 of my 4 years, I was assigned to 4 different teams. I actually left the military in part for more stability so I could focus my career in one area.

I hope this helps manage expectations a little. If you have any additional questions about military service, I'd be happy to help.

~Ryan, U.S. Air Force, 2014-2018
Thank you comment icon not exactly what i meant by "being the new guy" I don't mind being the new guy but i don't want to be treated like I'm incredibly stupid and i don't know anything about anything at all that's where I get the problems from connor
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jose’s Answer

Yes but you will still be working with different people in stressful environments (sometimes). If you would like to join the military, do so. But perhaps look to improve your interpersonal interaction. When I became a pilot I thought I would be surround with airplane enthusiasts like myself. So far, I have met 1 in a sea of pilots. You will come across different people who you might not agree with wherever you go. Just remain tactful and go about your way.
0