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What is the difference between a two years of college compare to four?

I want to know the pros and cons of enrolling either in a 4 year or 2 year. The differences between them.

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Alyssa’s Answer

In just two years, you can earn an Associate degree, and in four years, a Bachelors degree. I'm proud to have both, but I must admit, the Bachelors degree not only enriches your educational journey, it also adds a sparkle to your resume.
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Thomas’s Answer

Jackie is absolutely right, however I just wanted to add a few things. While an associates degree is much better than jumping right into the job market (mainly because it gives you time to learn and grow before working), it will probably only be a jumping off point for whatever you want to do because most everything except for a few areas requires a higher degree than just associates.

I'll put it like this, if you want to be a lawyer, you will have to get a 4 year degree (bachelor's degree) and then go on to Law School for 2 years- that would be your masters. A similar track would be required for being a professor, though a lot of professors go the extra mile and get a doctor's degree as well. There are qualifications that have to be met that are past an associates degree for most full time jobs except for maybe the arts, blue collar work (you would get an apprenticeship most likely for this), dental hygienist, travel jobs (such as air traffic control), or assistant jobs.

Statistically, people who go for higher degrees make more money, though that doesn't mean you can't be successful with an associates degree. You really just have to do what feels right to you and see what interests you. No matter what, you should always do what you enjoy doing for work.

Hope this helps.
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Jackie’s Answer

Hello,

Embarking on a two-year journey at a community college will reward you with an associate's degree. Alternatively, dedicating four years at a university will see you graduating with a bachelor's degree.

The path you choose hinges on your career aspirations. Each option carries its unique advantages and disadvantages. Some professions require a bachelor's degree, making a four-year university a potentially beneficial choice. Yet, if you are unsure, a two-year community college offers a fantastic starting point. At the end of this period, you have the freedom to either dive into the job market or transfer your earned credits to a four-year university to further your education.

The question to ask yourself is, what do I envision for my future? And remember, it's perfectly fine if you don't have an answer yet! Community college serves as an excellent platform for exploration, allowing you to discover your passions before deciding whether to extend your educational journey and where to do so.
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Martha’s Answer

Hi, Jennifer, you have asked an excellent question and gotten great information from Jackie and Thomas. To put into pro's and con's, I might say:
PROs for 2-Year:
- Less time & money
- Likely could live at home
- More time to explore academic and career choices
- Could transfer to 4-year college (check that all your credits will be transferred)
CONs for 2-Year:
- Lesser degree (associates versus bachelors)
- Not experiencing college "independent living"

PROs for 4-Year:
- Graduate with bachelors (often needed for full-time work)
- Experience of "independent living"
- Typically more research and study abroad opportunities than 2-year
CONs for 4-Year:
- Typically more expensive so potentially more debt
- Homesickness

If you are uncertain, you could start at a 2-year and transfer. Or complete an associates degree, work for a while, and get the bacherlors later.

Good luck!
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Julie’s Answer

Hey!

You have gotten some great advice from Martha, Jackie, Thomas, and Alyssa on this already. I just wanted to add that I personally hold both an associates degree (2 year) and a bachelor's degree (4 years) as well as many of my friends. To add onto the previous amazing replies, I would weigh the financial aspect of the degree you ultimately wish to end up receiving. For me and my friends, we all wanted to be teachers. Knowing this we choose to work and attend our general ed classes at a community college receiving our associate's degrees before we transferred to a university to receive our bachelor's degrees. The price savings allowed many of us to take out less in student loans, when comparing to the income we would be getting in our profession. Being almost 10 years out of college now it is one of the things I am most proud of myself for doing when I was younger, as I have considerably less in student loan debt than many of my colleagues.
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