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Como descubriste cual es tu carrera ideal?

How did you discover what your ideal career is?

Hello, I'm Alexander, I'm close to finishing high school and I would like to know how those who have already completed their degree discovered it.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Kathy’s Answer

Hi Alexander! This is a challenge for sure! I know there are people out there who always knew what they wanted to do, or figured it out in high school and college. This has not been the case for me. I have gone back to school a few times, after being in my career for a while. I think there are two pieces of advice I wish someone had told me early on: 1.) Job shadowing. Job shadowing is HUGE. Why? Because until you are actually doing the job, you only know what it should be like on paper. I strongly suggest taking a few of your path interests and seeing who will allow you to shadow - even if it's just for one day. You get such a better sense of how it is. 2.) You may not know for sure for many years, but I think some of us are built not to know. To go with what we want at that time, learn and develop, and then feel the desire to do something else. And honestly, that is okay! So if you find yourself in a career that you thought is what you wanted, and you no longer want it, guess what? It was not a waste of time or money or anything because in each job there is growth and development that you take with you onto the next one. Don't be afraid to try something just because you aren't 100% sure it is what you will want 5 or 10 or 20 years from now. Find something that gets you excited! And job shadow. And then go for it! All I know for sure is, it will all be okay :)
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Alexander,

My Answer:

In 1966 in grade 5 I was an introverted nine-year-old. I stayed home from school that year when I was sick. I saw Professor Julius Sumner-Miller doing a science presentation on television. His methodology had just demonstrated to me how to do public speaking. Fairly soon other teachers came to our classroom to borrow me to lecture their class on science.

In 1972 I was in a grade 11 physics class and the teacher brought out computer programming cards for us to mark with soft HB pencils. That was the start of my learning to program. I was in my high school finishing year and one of my close relatives died. It was my uncle and he was only 38 years of age. The medicos had worked on him for an hour trying to revive him, to no avail.

In 1976 my uncle's academic supervisor from 15 years before, commenced lecturing in biochemistry at our new university. I changed my major from mathematics and physics to biochemistry and organic chemistry.

Instead of studying medicine, I did work experience helping natural therapists. At the advice of an iconic local medical expert, I studied nutritional medicine. Next, my father dies from a big myocardial infarction. I started my studies to be a dietitian. It was way too late for me to help my relatives. I consulted thousands of patients over the next 35 years.

In 1994 a patient came back for a review consultation. She was not happy with the nutritional education materials that dietitians usually distributed. It was usually in the form of a one-day sample food menu. The duration between the initial consultation and the second attendance was 14 days. Even with food group exchange lists people were flat- out deciphering what to eat.

So I wrote software to design food menus for 2 weeks. The program would take the client's data, sex, height, age, weight, and compile a food menu. I have continued programming, I have not stopped learning. I have been working on Diet Wizard since 1994. I am on YouTube.Studio

https://www.youtube.com/user/yimi90125/videos

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AI:

Discovering Your Ideal Career

It’s great that you’re thinking about your future career, Alexander! There’s no single right answer to how people discover their ideal career, as it’s a very personal journey. Here are some common paths and strategies:

1. Exploring Your Interests and Passions:

Identify your hobbies and activities you enjoy: What do you do in your free time? What are you naturally drawn to? Do you enjoy working with your hands, solving problems, creating things, or helping others?
Think about your strengths and skills: What are you good at? What do you find easy to learn? Do you have strong communication skills, analytical skills, or creative skills?
Consider your values: What’s important to you in a job? Do you value stability, creativity, helping others, or making a difference?

2. Researching Different Career Options:

Talk to people in different fields: Reach out to professionals in careers that interest you and ask them about their work experiences, challenges, and rewards.
Explore online resources: Websites like Indeed.com, LinkedIn, and Glassdoor provide information about different careers, job descriptions, and salary ranges.
Attend career fairs and workshops: These events offer opportunities to network with professionals and learn about different industries.

3. Gaining Experience Through Internships and Volunteering:

Internships: Internships provide hands-on experience in a specific field and can help you confirm or refine your career interests.
Volunteering: Volunteering allows you to explore different areas of interest and develop valuable skills while giving back to your community.

4. Seeking Guidance from Professionals:

Career counselors: Career counselors can help you assess your interests, skills, and values and provide guidance on career exploration and planning.
Teachers and professors: Your teachers and professors can offer insights into different fields and provide recommendations for further exploration.

5. Being Open to New Opportunities:

Don’t be afraid to try new things: Explore different subjects, take on new challenges, and be open to unexpected opportunities.
Be flexible and adaptable: The job market is constantly changing, so it’s important to be adaptable and willing to learn new skills.

Remember, discovering your ideal career is an ongoing process. It may take time, exploration, and some trial and error. Be patient with yourself, stay curious, and don’t be afraid to ask for help along the way.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used in Answering this Question:

1. Indeed.com: A popular job search website that provides information about different careers, job descriptions, and salary ranges.

2. LinkedIn: A professional networking platform that allows users to connect with professionals in different fields and learn about their experiences.

3. Glassdoor: A website that provides company reviews, salary information, and interview questions, offering insights into different workplaces and career paths.

God Bless You,
JC.
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Nathan’s Answer

You know this is a harder thought experiment than it looks like. I have mastered 3 different industries and an currently starting a fourth and still really don't know the answer myself. I imagine it's just to start something until it doesn't have any more to offer you and then move on to something else that is interesting to you.
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James’s Answer

I have been using a free online assessment to help students and adults with career exploration for years. Go to:
https://www.mynextmove.org/explore/ip
When answering, I strongly recommend that you answer based solely on your interest, not on how practical, etc.
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Ximena’s Answer

Hi Alexander! Choosing a career path was a challenging journey for me. During my middle school years, I was intrigued by the idea of becoming a paranormal investigator. However, I quickly realized that this option wasn't available in high school. This led me to explore the medical field, a decision influenced by a minor knee injury my brother had. As I delved into my college semester, I discovered that a career in medicine wasn't the right fit for me. So, I decided to pivot towards criminal justice, a field that I found genuinely engaging and comfortable. It's essential to follow your instincts when it comes to choosing a career. You might want to consider asking yourself these three key questions:
Am I truly passionate about this?
Can I envision a future in this field?
Will this career have a positive impact on my community?
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Ximena’s Answer

Hello Alexander! For me, it wasn't easy to decide what I wanted to do as career. When I was around in middle school, I wanted to be a paranormal investigator, but I realized that high school won't have that option, so I went into the medical field because of my brother accidentally scraped his knee. During my college semester, I realized that the medical field wasn't not my career anymore, so I switched it up to criminal justice. This field has something that I truly enjoyed and feel comfortable with it. You just have to feel what is right for you, for example, you should ask these 3 questions to yourself:
- Do I really enjoy this?
- Do I see a future in this field?
- Would this career impact your community?
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Jordan’s Answer

Hi Alexander,

For me, it was a long and hectic journey. I graduated high-school thinking I wanted to be a civil engineer, but after an internship with a general contractor, I realized that was not for me. I had enjoyed my chemistry courses during the start of college, and I had always been interested in the life sciences, and so I switched to being a chemistry major. I did quite well in my courses, and greatly enjoyed organic chemistry, but was dissuaded from continuing my studies from others in the industry who had said that the field was extremely competitive without the compensation to match. During my chemistry program, I had to take a number of higher-elective math courses, which I fell in love with, and so I ended up switching to mathematics, which is the program I am finishing in. While there are aspects of the major that I don't particularly like or enjoy, it aligns closest with my career goals, and for that I'm happy.

The reason why I tell this story is because it took me a very long time to decide what I wanted to do, and I couldn't have known what I wanted to do unless I tried new things and explored my options. Each time I thought I knew with 100% certainty what I wanted to do, and each time I found out more about myself - what I liked and didn't like, what I was strong at and what came incredibly difficult to me, etc. I was able to learn from each experience and take the skills and knowledge I had gained and apply them to new experiences, and I believe this made me a more well-rounded student and researcher. I realized that there are a lot of unique and interesting opportunities when you apply the things you have learned to more interdisciplinary problems or jobs, and I think I am much happier now than I would have been previously had I just stuck to one major and forced myself to finish. Don't be afraid to take a step back, evaluate your goals, plans, happiness, and make adjustments when necessary - very few people finish school with the major they first start with, and that's perfectly okay!
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