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What are the requirements of becoming a game designer? Is it worth it?

You design a game, yes, but will I be responsible for possessing any other skills? Do I need to be good at coding, math, etc to even think of being a game designer? Most importantly, is game design worth it compared to my other choices like coding? Are game designers in high demand or should I be looking into something else? #computer-science #art #game-design

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Meg’s Answer

Yes, you need to be responsible for other skills - one of the most critical things in game design is likely how to consider the user experience, and making sure you consider multiple skillsets. Also understanding requirements and being able to express requirements, if you cannot do the programming yourself.... that's probably key as well. The skillsets for game design can be applied elsewhere, such as User Experience, website design, etc

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sumeet’s Answer

Hi,
A professional game design degree is useful (though in India you can't find quality game design related degree, approved by AICTE). Also, the likes of DSK and ICAT are alarmingly expensive! So as far as education is concerned, I think a computer related degree always helps. Or if you have artistic traits, go for BFA or CEED.


Try to get into the industry asap and get to understand how games are actually made.


A game designer must have knowledge and interests in a variety of subjects (Maths, Physics, History, Psychology, Architecture, Films, etc.). read a lot of stuffs, that's where you get your ideas from.


A game designer needs to be analytical, articulate and very logical. Can you make quick decisions with valid reasoning? Yes, as game designers you need to make vital decisions. So, do you have these traits in you? Ask your self!


Most importantly, do you live and breathe games? Do you relate incidents from real life into game mechanics? Do you always feel that a particular game must have been designed the other way? Play a lot of games. Observe, observe and study games. Because you cannot come up with a new idea always. What you need to do is.... design an existing system that is more familiar to players. Mix and match your options.

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Elaine’s Answer

To be perfectly honest, Game Design specifically is not a field that's in high demand in the video games industry. So many people want to be game designers without having any other practical skills, and that makes it a highly competitive field. The best game designers tend to the types of people who are constantly making games in their free time. There are lots of people who play games and think "It would be so much better if they did this" or "I could make this so much better" without any practical experience at actually making games.


And you don't have to be a game designer to make an awesome game. Game design certainly is a fun career, but there are so many other aspects of making a game that are equally fun, if not more. Games are created by teams of people with different expertise. Generally it's game designers, artists, engineers/programmers, producers, managers, and QA/testers. There's a lot of different specialties within these fields. For example, the types of artists include: 2d animators, 3d animators, effects animators, user interface designers, user experience designers, environment modelers, character modelers, concept artists, and technical artists. I'd say the most in-demand fields within the industry are user interface or user experience designers and engineers. But if that's not something you enjoy it doesn't mean you can't get a job in the industry.


If you truly have a passion for games, I think the games industry is the absolute best place for you to be. And you can definitely get a job if you're willing to put in the hard work. Focus on practical skills and getting to a place where you feel that what you can offer is comparable to what a professional can offer. That is, if you're an artist your art portfolio has to stack up against a professional's. If you a designer, your should know how to make games inside an out, just like a professional would.


Hope that helps!

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