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Hi, Im a senior in high school and Im 16. In my Econ class, my teacher asked everyone what they want to do after high school. Everybody said something and I said college even though I wasn't sure about my answer. I really do want to go to university but the problem is that I don't know what to study. My mom really wants me to be a doctor(yes I'm Asian) but I really want to be an artist., but i dont want to go to college just to study art. I'm good at math and I'm also interested in business and law. any idea what I should choose as my career? Or what I should study in college?

#artist #high-school #math #art #college #idontknowwhattobe

Thank you comment icon That's perfectly alright as you still have a lot of time to make a decision. Even if you don't exactly know what you want to do in gr.12 but, you have somewhat of a rough idea that's still okay. Try researching different career occupations, find what interests you and what you dislike. Narrow it down so, it is easier for you to make a decision. Even though your mom may see joy from seeing you become a doctor be true to yourself! Don't think that if you decide something other than a doctor that you will disappoint her. Do some tests online to figure out your personality traits because they will easily give suggestions from your answers. Nisha

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Subject: Career question for you

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Ken’s Answer

Each individual is different, and it is important for each person to determine which career area might most closely fit their personality traits and then talk to professionals in related career fields to determine a comfortable fit.


Getting to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to people involved in various career opportunities is very important in your decision making process. During my many years in Human Resources and College Recruiting, I ran across too many students who had skipped this very important step and ended up in a job situation which for which they were not well suited. Selecting a career area is like buying a pair of shoes. First you have to be properly fitted for the correct size, and then you need to try on and walk in the various shoe options to determine which is fits the best and is most comfortable for you to wear. Following are some important steps which I developed during my career which have been helpful to many .

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
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Ronald’s Answer

As long as you get started somewhere you're on the right path. Most institution have counselors to help you on that path. And usually for the first 2 years of school are usually basic classes

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Joseph’s Answer

Zahra, Ken provided a lot of great advice in his response. I'd just like to add that it's perfectly normal to not have a specific major in mind before you graduate high school. I'd encourage you to reflect and see what you're most passionate about, then partner with experts like guidance counsellors and professionals already in your fields of interest. It's also common to take general classes in your first semester or two of college without declaring a major. Good luck!

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