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In art school, what should I look out for?

#art #fine-art #college #design

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Ellen’s Answer

Hi Danielle:


Good for you! Art school can be a very exciting and stimulating time in your life. From my experience, here are somethings you should look out for.


  1. You should have an idea of what kind of art you want to pursue, fine art or graphic design, or interior design, or computer graphics....etc. Look for a school that offers those subjects. If you are unsure, look for a school that offers general art classes. Talk to your art teachers or guidance counselor for suggestions.
  2. Visit the art school if you can. This will give you an idea of the learning environment and if you feel comfortable being there. You can also see the facilities--what the studios look like, what sort of resources are available to students. For example, if you want to major in computer graphics, see if you can find out about their computer labs. If you can't visit, contact the school's alumni office to see if any graduates live near you and whom you could contact.
  3. Visit some schools' websites and check out their admission requirements, and make sure you can meet them. How are your grades in all your classes, what does your art portfolio look like, what types of extra curricular activities have you been involved in?
  4. From the art schools' websites, try to get a feel for how and what their graduates do after graduation. What percentage of their graduates have some sort of job in the arts field? See if the schoolshave any internships, these can be invaluable in gaining real life experience and some professional references for future job applications.

I hope this helps. Best wishes!





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Ken’s Answer

Look for things that make you smile. Look for things that will allow you to develop your art in your way.


When considering an art school make a phone call to the Director of Alumni Relations to arrange to meet and talk to graduates of that school to learn from them about the school experience, what they are doing now, how they got there, and what advice and suggestions that they might have for you.


Before you get this far, it might be a good idea to gt to know yourself better to get a better idea of how you might fit into the art world.



Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
It really does not matter what school you attend, as the most important factors are how well you do with the school work, which is an indication to an employer about what kind of employee you will be, and the effort that you put forth in your networking to set up networking connections that will help you throughout your education/career journey. Here is an important video for you to watch: ## http://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lythcott_haims_how_to_raise_successful_kids_without_over_parenting?utm_campaign=social&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_content=talk&utm_term=education ##
Thank you comment icon Another thing that you might want to look for would be ways to reduce costs. Here are some good tips: ## http://www.educationplanner.org/students/paying-for-school/ways-to-pay/reduce-college-costs.shtml ## Ken Simmons
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