2 answers

I am a good student but I have a 1270 SAT score is it possible for me to be accepted to and IVY League university?

Asked Port St. Lucie, Florida

2 answers

Scott’s Answer

Updated Chicago, Illinois

First off, do not get discouraged. SAT scores are just one measurement of your success. They are a very common standard for colleges to utilize in determining your eligibility for attending their school; however, SAT scores are just one of many factors that decide your acceptance into a college or university.


Check out average required SAT scores for the schools you desire to attend. These are often listed on their admissions pages or can be found out by contacting the admissions department for a school. You can also see average SAT score requirements on college placement websites such as: https://magoosh.com/hs/sat/2016/sat-score-range-good-score-colleges/


With that said, some colleges will accept you for a variety of different reasons. I once received a college offer from a Indiana Wesleyan University for a full ride with only an application and no test scores sent. This was heavily due to the fact I made the admissions office laugh at my mathematically essay on how they could have paid for my tuition based on the postage sent to me over four years. Nevertheless, this proves that college applications can lead to acceptance for a variety of reasons.


If all else fails, take an SAT prep course or online program and retake the SAT. This can improve your scores and improve your chances of attending the school you desire.


In the worst case scenario, open up your mind to other college options. Sometimes dismissal from one college is a blessing in disguise. You may find a college more appealing that you never noticed in your first round of considerations.

Scott recommends the following next steps:

  • Check out average required SAT scores at https://magoosh.com/hs/sat/2016/sat-score-range-good-score-colleges/
  • Do not get discouraged.
  • Consider retaking the SAT or talking to a representative at the colleges.

Vicki’s Answer

Updated

Sabrina,

I agree with Scott Bedell who commented before me. However, colleges and universities are also interested in "you" the person! If you have done volunteer work and are involved in your community that would/should also help you. After all, in the real world people working everyday, including career people are volunteering for nonprofits who cannot afford to pay for their expertise. This is a way for them to help AND give back to the community at the same time. One day after you have graduated and have a substantial job you will be doing the same! I am a retired university librarian but volunteered while working and still mentor at-risk high school seniors. Volunteering would show the colleges you are considering that in addition to your test scores and GPA you are also a well-rounded individual!