41 answers

What are some good questions to ask the interviewer to get a better understanding of the company you work for

42
100% of 41 Pros
Updated Viewed 1447 times Translate

to prepare yourself for the interview and look more prepared #computer-software #computer #management #university #accounting #marketing-and-advertising #job-application

42
100% of 41 Pros

41 answers

John’s Answer

3
100% of 2 Pros
Updated Translate

I believe asking the interviewer about their journey and understanding why they work for the company is a great way to learn about the company.

3
100% of 2 Pros

Alyssa’s Answer

2
100% of 2 Pros
Updated Translate
Hi Abbas! I think "What is the work life balance like at the firm?" is a great question. You want to know what you are getting yourself into when applying to a company.
2
100% of 2 Pros

Charles M’s Answer

1
Updated Translate

Abbas,


Let me make sure I understand what you are asking.


You said "What are some good questions to ask the interviewer to get a better understanding of the company you work for. to prepare yourself for the interview and look more prepared."


I'm assuming the interviewer is working for the company you want to understand better. is that correct?
One interpretation of your question is that you want to "get a better understanding of the company you [Abbas] wants to work for"
Another interpretation of your question is that you want to "get a better understanding of the company the interviewer works for".


So you want to know more about the company that you are applying for a job at, is that correct?


First of all, if you are interviewing for a job at a company, you will have wanted to do your homework and learned as much about the company as you can by researching it.


When you are looking at the company web site, you want to ask yourself a few questions.
Who are the company's customers?
What industries are the customer's in?
What problems do they have, that the company you are investigating provides solutions for?
What are the solutions the company provides to it's customers?


how did the company get started?
how is the company divided up?
where are the major locations are


Big companies usually have several large divisions with different products and different customers. So you want to make sure you understand the division of the company that the interviewer is representing.


Example: Toyota sells cars and trucks. But they also have a division that sells money to people who want to buy cars and trucks (Toyota Financial). You don't want to be prepared for an interview with the division that sells cars, when you are actually talking with the division that makes car loans.


The important thing to ask is a question that shows you have done your homework and researched as much as you can about the company.
If you can ask them about news releases you have found on their web site, or something you have read in the news about the company, that is good.
If you have not already uncovered it by looking on the web site, ask them about their quality policy and how they make sure they are meeting the needs of their customers?
if you don't already know, ask them about special programs they have for new college hires.
If the web site does not tell you, ask what they do to treat their employees right.
Ask them about what they are doing to attract the kinds of employees they want to hire.
Ask them why it's better to work for them than for their competitors?


hope those questions help

1

Martina’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate
This is a good way to build a rapport with the Interviewer.

QUESTION #1: What do the day-to-day responsibilities of the role look like?
QUESTION #2: What are the company's values?
QUESTION #3: What's your favorite part about working at the company?
QUESTION #4: What does success look like in this position, and how do you measure it?
1
100% of 1 Pros

Lauren’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
My advice is to ask about the culture of the company and what the interview loves most about working for the company.
0

Nadine’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
What is the most challenging part of this job? What is the skill set of someone who would succeed in this role? Here is a great resource with several questions: https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/questions-ask-an-interviewer/

Remember that an interview is just as much them asking you questions as you asking them. You want to make sure this is also a good fit for you!
0

Katherine’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

I think they best way to have a good interview, begins with being prepared for the interview. I think it's best to look up the company and learn about what they do, how they give back to the community, and what the culture is like. I would always ask "What makes you get up in the morning for work?" This question gets the interviewer thinking about what actually motivates them at the company.

0

Denise’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Hi Abbas! That is a good question. There are typical questions to ask such as work/life balance, company trends, typical day, and continuing education. However, there are also questions that give you a bit more insight into the company on a more personal level such as asking them why they choose the respective company and why they stuck through that choice. See the company from their perspective and see if it would align with your interests and beliefs. Best of luck!
0

Justin’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Hi Abbas!

This is a very good question. One question you could ask is about the company's culture, this will give you a good idea of whether you are a good fit. You could also ask about the values of the company which will allow you to see if there are shared values between you and the company. Another thing you could do is research about the different companies you are interested in and finding the one that appeals to you the most. Good luck!
0

Cinthya’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Here are some suggestion:
- How long have you been working in this company? Depending on their answer ask what brought them here or what keeps them there?
- Also is important to keep in mind work/life balance and how this place out.
- If they have any programs for continuing education?
- What are the perks that they are offered?

I will say that the most important part is to be clear with what you want and make sure your job place matches us those need.
0

Kristen’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Hi Abbas,

I am glad you are thinking about what questions you would ask! As an interviewer I always leave time for questions as it allows me to see how invested the candidate is in the career or my company. I would encourage you to spend time thinking about what is important to you? What are the characteristics of a Company you want to work for? Spend some time on the Company's website as well to review their mission and vision. However, even if you can find the answers on the website still ask the questions.

Some of the questions I liked are:
- what does your training program look like? How does the Company invest in continual learning and improvement?
- do you work independently or in teams? How are teams structured and supported?
- what does work/life balance mean to you and the Company?
- what are things you like about the Company, what do you dislike?
- what does the Company do to support the community?

Keep in mind, if you have multiple interviewers you can ask the same questions. Each person will have a different perspective.

0

Sara’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I always ask "a year from now, how will you know the person you've hired has been successful?". Or "what does success a year from now look like for this role?".

I ask it for a few reasons. The big one is pretty obvious, to get clarity on what success looks like. If the hiring manager has a clear and concise answer it signals to me that the priorities of the team are clear. And that is usually a pretty good indicator that the company priorities are clear as well (although you can always ask a follow up about that). If they stumble or are genuinely thrown by the question it makes me ask more questions around the company goals and how the work the team I'm apply for fits into those goals.

I also always try to ask a humanizing question. Something like "what gets you out of bed and coming here each day", "what work here are you most proud of?", or even questions around team dynamics, "do you all do lunches or happy hours together"? Small signals to see if people are opting in to spending additional time together usually means it has potential to be a fun and friendly environment.
0

Remy’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
There are so many good questions to ask- it really depends on what you are looking to gain from the company. One question that is important to me is, "What is the average tenure of a person at this company?" That question insinuates to the interviewer that you are hoping to add a lasting value to the company and stay committed to that team, but it also gives you insight to whether or not people like top work there. By that I mean if on average most people quit after a year or 2, it is likely not the most healthy work environment. People will stray at companies they love for four + years even if they do not necessarily "love" their career and people will also quit their jobs even if they love them if they have a terrible boss or toxic work environment. Churn- the constant internal change of employees is a bad sign- join a team where you see yourself growing. The money and job titles will come later, find a place you are comfortable spending 40+ hours a week. Good luck!
0

Jonathan’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Ask questions that demonstrate you've done research on the role and the company as whole. It's important to ask things relevant to the work you're doing but to make yourself stand out it's important to understand the business, at least at a high level, to show you're actually interested and aware of the landscape. You can use resources online like Glassdoor to get a feel for the type of questions you may find yourself being asked as well. Definitely ask people who have been through the interview process for similar roles for the types of questions they've encountered and the feedback they've received. And lastly, make sure you prepare with a friend, family member, or mentor ahead of the interview to get rid of any nerves.
0

Anita’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Great question and is so important that you have all the information you need to help you make an informed decision about your next career move
Questions to consider to ensure you are aligned with the company you are interviewing with
1. What are the companies Values ?

2. Tell me about a typical day in this company/department /role etc

3.Describe the Co Culture
0

Abbey’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
During the interview process, the portion of the interview when you can ask the interviewer questions is your chance to show your interest in the company and your research of the company. I have found asking questions about innovations at the company proves successful. Try asking: What innovation initiatives is the company pursuing? How has innovation impacted your everyday job? Also, based on the research you conducted about the company, ask about specific innovation initiatives being executed. Most companies, especially Big 4 Firms, are devoting extensive resources to innovating processes, so showing interest and knowledge of initiatives will set you apart from other candidates.
0

Lola’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Below are some of my favourite questions to ask the interviewer to evaluate the company:

What is your management style?
What are the growth opportunities within the firm?
What does a leadership team do to motivate their employees?
What are the learning opportunities within the firm?
0

Jp’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Abbas, few suggestions are
1) What is company's expectation to this role?
2) Per our discussion in the interview, what's your expectation to me? Do you have any suggestion I can do further improvement if I am qualified for the role.

Thanks.
0

Aaliyah’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I agree with Sarah. It's important to learn about an organization's culture and see how it aligns to your values. She has a great list to get you started. I also find it helpful to ask:

- How long have you worked for the organization and what do you like about your role?
- How have you grown in your career in your current role? How has the organization supported this?
- What are the strategic priorities of the organization?
- How are staff evaluated?

I hope these help and best of luck.
0

Xiang’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Hi Abbas,

It will help if you know what you want to get out of the question. What are you trying to get an understanding of? For example, do you want to know what people's days are like? Or do you want to know the career path that people take? Or do you simply want to know about the team culture? I would suggest taking some time and have specific questions as they also help recruiters/interviewers to give answers and help you make your decision.

0

Aneree’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Good questions to ask during an interview are industry related questions that could potentially affect the company that you are interviewing with. This shows your preparedness, and level of interest with the firm.
0

Eric’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
If you were interviewing a small size company, you may pay attention on the company. But if you were interviewing a large size company, such as Cisco, Microsoft... You can easily find company inforamtion online. in this case, you may interested on the position, the team, the department you may join later. So, your question may related to postion, team, even your boss. You could ask "What is my job daily response?" "How many people in my team? and what the relationship between us?" "How is our team or department co-work with other teams or departments? "
0

Alyssa’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Company culture can drastically impact how you socialize with coworkers and the general environment you are spending most of your time in. Personally, I think that finding a company culture that you feel comfortable in can have a huge impact on your daily happiness. I always make sure that I ask this in an interview so I can get a feel for what type of organization they are. For example, If they are more of a heads down workplace, and you are a naturally social person, it may not be the right fit for you to thrive in.

0

Paul’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Ask questions that show you have done your research into the company or allow the person to share their experience.

I like asking about challenges and successes.

I.E what is the hardest part of working at X? What is your proudest accomplishment at X? If it is a new/growth company, asking "what do you think the next 1-5 years will look like?"

0

Jerel O.’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
What do the day-to-day responsibilities of the role look like?
What are the company’s values? What characteristics do you look for in employees in order to represent those values?
What’s your favorite part about working at the company?
What does success look like in this position, and how do you measure it?
Are there opportunities for professional development? If so, what do those look like?
What do you see as the most challenging aspect of this job?
0

Jodi V.’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Ask work environment related questions, so you get a feel for the company culture. Topic examples include individual activities, dress code, work schedules, lunch breaks, team events, performance metrics, etc.
0

Sarah’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

To add to some great answers above, I would ask what the interviewer thinks about the company culture and values - I find that working for a company that reflects your own principles makes it easier to be loyal and hard-working. For me, ethics are very important as well as an emphasis on people development and flexibility. Something I didn't realise when I joined my company was that the option to move around different business groups and functions would turn out to be a key reason for staying with the company so perhaps think a few steps ahead of the job you are going for - what would progression look like? Would you be able to move around to gain experience? How is the company viewed within the industry?
Good luck with your career.

0

moises’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

The one thing I remember that helped me get into the company I'm today was that I did my research of the company and the product I was interviewing for. I searched the web and found quite a bit of information. When I when into the interviews, it really did help me. I could relate to the interviewers and they were willing to share even more information.

0

Abgour’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Abbas, you have asked a very good question. You should know that curious candidates tend to have a better impression than those who ask no questions during job interviews. Unfortunately, lots of job seekers focus more on answering that they forget to prepare good questions for the employer too. Posing your questions during the interview does not only show that you possess the qualifications needed for the position, but it’ll help clarify a lot of ambiguities that might rise up after you get the job, such as if this is an organization you really want to be a part of.
In order to ask the right question, a painstaking research is necessary so that you can understand what the company does and what its future projects are, it will show that you are in the conversation too and that the interview is not a one way street. There are several right questions you can ask; for instance, ask about the team you will be working with. The way you ask the question assumes you will get the job. Do not forget to ask about the trainings they offer and their onboarding process. Personally, I like asking about plans of growth and if the environment offers an evolving context for its employees. This particular question shows that you are looking for prosperity within that company. Also, do not hesitate to ask questions regarding who previously held the position. Although it may seem unnecessary, but this direct question will help you have an idea about if the workers within that organization are happy or not (got promoted, fired, resigned, etc.).
I wish you a very good luck.

0

Alex’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
My favorites questions to ask are to walk me through a typical day and then to describe the workplace culture.
0

Shante’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Hi Abbas,
I think to give more insight on your question, would be to do some research on the company prior to the interview. Know the Founder, President/CEO, as much information as possible in the event you are asked questions, but also so you can let the interviewer know that you have knowledge regarding the company and things you want have better clarification on. All the advice provided above is great and you should think about what field or industry you want to be in. Pick a career that is versatile and you are compelled to stay in that field forever.

0

Noah’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Try to ask prying questions to get the interviewer to open up about their personal experience!

"How has (your company) helped develop your skills?"
"Did you face any challenges in your first few months on the job? How were you able to tackle those?"
"How do you feel that you've grown over your time at this company?"

Hopefully they will respond with a candid answer
0

Jordan’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Having been someone who has interviewed a very large number of people I have been asked a great deal of questions. Below are a few of my favorites, as I feel they show you have a genuine interest and are committed to long term goals:



  1. What is the company's mission statement?

  2. What are the current goals of the company/department?

  3. What do you feel are traits that fit best in the environment you work in?


Honestly, any time an candidate has well thoughtout questions, it shows interest and I remember them. Do some research, know the company/position you are walking into the interview for. Show them that you are genuinely interested by being engaged and I am sure you will do well!

0

Lauren’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
It depends on the job, but I always love to ask what the culture is like, what a typical day looks like working there, what makes them excited about their job, etc. It's a great opportunity to get an inside perspective on a place before you work there!
0

Lauren’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
My advice is to ask about the culture of the company and what the interview loves most about working for the company.
0

Raj’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
There are many different questions you can ask during an interview, general and specific questions. I will give some general questions but it is nice to add a specific question or two that is directly related to the job you are applying for. Here are a few of the general ones that I recommend.

1. What is your interviewers' day-to-day job like and what would your day-to-day look like?
2. What excited them to work for the company?
3. How many people would you directly work with? What is the team like?
4. What is the company culture like?
5. How is feedback given to employees?
6. What are the company's business current focus areas as a whole?
7. Are employees rewarded for excellent work?
8. When can I expect to hear back from you?
0

Alnaya’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I always ask about the company culture and values. Then, I decide on whether the interviewers displayed those values and the culture. Looking at the reviews of the company on Glassdoor from previous and current employees can also give you insight on the culture.
0

Alicia’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Back in my interview days, I asked all of my interviewers, "What has kept you at the firm all of these years?" It gives you a broader look at the organization as a whole. Often times you get answers that talk about things like mentoring or how the firm has evolved over the years or the culture, which are things that you can't always get from a job description.

0

Alexandra’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Sure, there are many questions you can ask the interviewer. Your questions should focus on the strategy/future of the company and on the expectations for your role. Here are some examples:

  1. What is the company's strategy for the next 5 years? Is the company growing?
  2. What is the path to promotion?
  3. Do people work with teams and collaborate?
  4. What are the main groups/departments within the company and how do they interact?
  5. What is the company culture like?
  6. To what extent will I have contact with clients in my role?
  7. Does the company have a mentoring system/program?
  8. What is the annual review process like?
0

Paul’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Hi Abbas,

I personally think the best questions to ask are the ones you truly want to know. With that said, however, the questions that I usually ask are ones that are more personal to the interviewer such as: What are the pros and cons of your job in the company? What would you say is a highlight of your line of work at this company? What does a typical day look like? What's your favorite perks of the job?

By making questions more personal, it'll have more credibility as interviewers usually speak from a bias standpoint of positively representing the company they're working for.

Sincerely,

Paul
0

Davor’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Typical questions to ask:
How does a typical day look like?
How does the company balance the work/life balance?
How does continuing education work?

0