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What are some good questions to ask the interviewer to get a better understanding of the company you work for

to prepare yourself for the interview and look more prepared #computer-software #computer #management #university #accounting #marketing-and-advertising #job-application

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John’s Answer

I believe asking the interviewer about their journey and understanding why they work for the company is a great way to learn about the company.

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Alyssa’s Answer

Hi Abbas! I think "What is the work life balance like at the firm?" is a great question. You want to know what you are getting yourself into when applying to a company.
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Charles M’s Answer

Abbas,


Let me make sure I understand what you are asking.


You said "What are some good questions to ask the interviewer to get a better understanding of the company you work for. to prepare yourself for the interview and look more prepared."


I'm assuming the interviewer is working for the company you want to understand better. is that correct?
One interpretation of your question is that you want to "get a better understanding of the company you [Abbas] wants to work for"
Another interpretation of your question is that you want to "get a better understanding of the company the interviewer works for".


So you want to know more about the company that you are applying for a job at, is that correct?


First of all, if you are interviewing for a job at a company, you will have wanted to do your homework and learned as much about the company as you can by researching it.


When you are looking at the company web site, you want to ask yourself a few questions.
Who are the company's customers?
What industries are the customer's in?
What problems do they have, that the company you are investigating provides solutions for?
What are the solutions the company provides to it's customers?


how did the company get started?
how is the company divided up?
where are the major locations are


Big companies usually have several large divisions with different products and different customers. So you want to make sure you understand the division of the company that the interviewer is representing.


Example: Toyota sells cars and trucks. But they also have a division that sells money to people who want to buy cars and trucks (Toyota Financial). You don't want to be prepared for an interview with the division that sells cars, when you are actually talking with the division that makes car loans.


The important thing to ask is a question that shows you have done your homework and researched as much as you can about the company.
If you can ask them about news releases you have found on their web site, or something you have read in the news about the company, that is good.
If you have not already uncovered it by looking on the web site, ask them about their quality policy and how they make sure they are meeting the needs of their customers?
if you don't already know, ask them about special programs they have for new college hires.
If the web site does not tell you, ask what they do to treat their employees right.
Ask them about what they are doing to attract the kinds of employees they want to hire.
Ask them why it's better to work for them than for their competitors?


hope those questions help

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Martina’s Answer

This is a good way to build a rapport with the Interviewer.

QUESTION #1: What do the day-to-day responsibilities of the role look like?
QUESTION #2: What are the company's values?
QUESTION #3: What's your favorite part about working at the company?
QUESTION #4: What does success look like in this position, and how do you measure it?
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Lauren’s Answer

My advice is to ask about the culture of the company and what the interview loves most about working for the company.
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moises’s Answer

The one thing I remember that helped me get into the company I'm today was that I did my research of the company and the product I was interviewing for. I searched the web and found quite a bit of information. When I when into the interviews, it really did help me. I could relate to the interviewers and they were willing to share even more information.

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Cinthya’s Answer

Here are some suggestion:
- How long have you been working in this company? Depending on their answer ask what brought them here or what keeps them there?
- Also is important to keep in mind work/life balance and how this place out.
- If they have any programs for continuing education?
- What are the perks that they are offered?

I will say that the most important part is to be clear with what you want and make sure your job place matches us those need.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hi Abbas!

I think asking about the company's initiatives is always good. For example, do they have a Diversity & Inclusion Network, a Tech Committee, a Newsletter Team? This way you would know a few different ways you could get involved beside just working at the Company. Joining a committee or a group gives you access to other individuals outside of those you work directly with and can help expand your network at the company.
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Jp’s Answer

Abbas, few suggestions are
1) What is company's expectation to this role?
2) Per our discussion in the interview, what's your expectation to me? Do you have any suggestion I can do further improvement if I am qualified for the role.

Thanks.
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Alexandra’s Answer

Sure, there are many questions you can ask the interviewer. Your questions should focus on the strategy/future of the company and on the expectations for your role. Here are some examples:

  1. What is the company's strategy for the next 5 years? Is the company growing?
  2. What is the path to promotion?
  3. Do people work with teams and collaborate?
  4. What are the main groups/departments within the company and how do they interact?
  5. What is the company culture like?
  6. To what extent will I have contact with clients in my role?
  7. Does the company have a mentoring system/program?
  8. What is the annual review process like?
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Anita’s Answer

Great question and is so important that you have all the information you need to help you make an informed decision about your next career move
Questions to consider to ensure you are aligned with the company you are interviewing with
1. What are the companies Values ?

2. Tell me about a typical day in this company/department /role etc

3.Describe the Co Culture
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Denise’s Answer

Hi Abbas! That is a good question. There are typical questions to ask such as work/life balance, company trends, typical day, and continuing education. However, there are also questions that give you a bit more insight into the company on a more personal level such as asking them why they choose the respective company and why they stuck through that choice. See the company from their perspective and see if it would align with your interests and beliefs. Best of luck!
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Sarah’s Answer

To add to some great answers above, I would ask what the interviewer thinks about the company culture and values - I find that working for a company that reflects your own principles makes it easier to be loyal and hard-working. For me, ethics are very important as well as an emphasis on people development and flexibility. Something I didn't realise when I joined my company was that the option to move around different business groups and functions would turn out to be a key reason for staying with the company so perhaps think a few steps ahead of the job you are going for - what would progression look like? Would you be able to move around to gain experience? How is the company viewed within the industry?
Good luck with your career.

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Kristen’s Answer

Hi Abbas,

I am glad you are thinking about what questions you would ask! As an interviewer I always leave time for questions as it allows me to see how invested the candidate is in the career or my company. I would encourage you to spend time thinking about what is important to you? What are the characteristics of a Company you want to work for? Spend some time on the Company's website as well to review their mission and vision. However, even if you can find the answers on the website still ask the questions.

Some of the questions I liked are:
- what does your training program look like? How does the Company invest in continual learning and improvement?
- do you work independently or in teams? How are teams structured and supported?
- what does work/life balance mean to you and the Company?
- what are things you like about the Company, what do you dislike?
- what does the Company do to support the community?

Keep in mind, if you have multiple interviewers you can ask the same questions. Each person will have a different perspective.

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Jordan’s Answer

Hi Abbas,

I find that typically at the end of the interview, those holding it expect you to ask a few questions. The questions you ask should focus on the key areas that are important to you when finding a career. This can range from salary to company culture to future career opportunities within that company – this varies for everyone. Another thing that could impact the questions you ask is information and conversation you’ve had. Most times out of the questions you’ve prepared to ask usually 1 or 2 are answered prior to the end of the interview. Taking notes during the interview can help you not only remember for later, but also serve as a reminder that you’ve gotten the answer to that question and can replace it for another question.

Keep the questions focused on the details that you value when choosing a career. Some questions that I’ve used in the past are:
1. What can I expect from a day to day operations standpoint for this position?
2. Can you please describe the company’s work environment and team culture.
3. Why did you come to this company?
4. Where do you see this company in the next few years? What excites you the most about the company’s future?
5. Can I answer any final questions for you?

Each of these questions’ centers on a different aspect of the job or company. Any of these questions have the potential for sparking further discussions. The last question gives an opportunity for interviewer to ask any questions he may have missed. It also makes sure they have all the information they need and that you’re ready for the next steps.

Hopefully this helps -- Good luck!
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Sara’s Answer

I always ask "a year from now, how will you know the person you've hired has been successful?". Or "what does success a year from now look like for this role?".

I ask it for a few reasons. The big one is pretty obvious, to get clarity on what success looks like. If the hiring manager has a clear and concise answer it signals to me that the priorities of the team are clear. And that is usually a pretty good indicator that the company priorities are clear as well (although you can always ask a follow up about that). If they stumble or are genuinely thrown by the question it makes me ask more questions around the company goals and how the work the team I'm apply for fits into those goals.

I also always try to ask a humanizing question. Something like "what gets you out of bed and coming here each day", "what work here are you most proud of?", or even questions around team dynamics, "do you all do lunches or happy hours together"? Small signals to see if people are opting in to spending additional time together usually means it has potential to be a fun and friendly environment.
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Abgour’s Answer

Abbas, you have asked a very good question. You should know that curious candidates tend to have a better impression than those who ask no questions during job interviews. Unfortunately, lots of job seekers focus more on answering that they forget to prepare good questions for the employer too. Posing your questions during the interview does not only show that you possess the qualifications needed for the position, but it’ll help clarify a lot of ambiguities that might rise up after you get the job, such as if this is an organization you really want to be a part of.
In order to ask the right question, a painstaking research is necessary so that you can understand what the company does and what its future projects are, it will show that you are in the conversation too and that the interview is not a one way street. There are several right questions you can ask; for instance, ask about the team you will be working with. The way you ask the question assumes you will get the job. Do not forget to ask about the trainings they offer and their onboarding process. Personally, I like asking about plans of growth and if the environment offers an evolving context for its employees. This particular question shows that you are looking for prosperity within that company. Also, do not hesitate to ask questions regarding who previously held the position. Although it may seem unnecessary, but this direct question will help you have an idea about if the workers within that organization are happy or not (got promoted, fired, resigned, etc.).
I wish you a very good luck.

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