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Is it possible to pursue a master's degree or doctorate degree in clinical/counseling psychology with a psychology minor?

I'm a few semesters away from graduating with a BA in women, gender, and sexuality studies, with a minor in psychology. I was originally planning to double major in psychology, but it's going to cost me extra time and money that I'm not sure I can afford. I have been an undergraduate student for much longer than the standard 4 years because of life circumstances that were beyond my control. I want to hurry up and graduate, pursue an advanced degree, and finally begin my career. I've waited so long. I have taken all of the basic psychology courses along with a few advanced courses. I performed well in each of them. I'm passionate about the subject and have been for most of my life. I want to focus on clinical or counseling psychology. I would love to have my own practice someday. Unfortunately, I haven't taken all of the advanced math or science classes that are required for the major. Knowing all of this, do you think a graduate program would accept me with only a minor? Is there a particular specialty that I should pursue because I'll have a better chance of making it work? #psychology #college-major #clinical-psychologist #counseling

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Ross’s Answer

Now is the time to start contacting graduate programs. Each school has there own criteria. Check out specific course prerequisites and graduate exams. Can you get an appointment with an admissions counselor? Read

Several brochures. Ask about connections with internships that may lead to paying jobs. There are a lot of online schools, which may have good reputations, but may not provide other connections with agencies near you.


Does the school program you are in now have any classes that include credit for experience in local counseling or mental health setting?


When I got my BA in the 1970s I had a year-long class that met once a week with the rest of the time being spent in a community mental health center, doing supervised counseling. That was an opening to a first job and was helpful on applications.


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Meghana’s Answer

I recently graduated with a double major in Gender Studies and Psychology, and am interested in Clinical/Counseling Psychology as well! Having done a Psychology major definitely helps, especially with coursework etc, but having research experience and some hands-on / clinical experience (especially for some counseling/PsyD programs) is important regardless. If you are sure you want to pursue the Clinical Psych route, getting relevant work experience (ie working as a Clinical Research Coordinator) could help also, especially if you are concerned about not having done the major.

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