2 answers

what was the hardest challenge being a video game editor

Updated Burlington, Iowa

2 answers

Shubham’s Answer

Updated Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

keep reading video game blogs, you start to see a pattern of announcements, reviews, previews, click-bait, etc. If you write the same thing as everyone else, you're not going to grow and build your individual brand and following. I for one was very interested in new trends. For example, when Disney acquired Playdom, it was an indication that mobile and social network games were here to stay. A company as big as Disney is averse to risk and so they won't make an investment in such an acquisition unless they saw this trend, which was very new and bleeding edge at the time, was a long-term thing. That was my POV when I wrote about the acquisition. NO ONE ELSE really cared so you hardly saw anyone else writing about it. They were stuck talking about games themselves, click-baity stuff like this dev said this, and that leader said that. Personally, it gave me satisfaction that I was putting forth a unique voice in a saturated market. It also got me promoted to the national video game news and reviews beat for the site I was writing for at the time.

Francisco’s Answer

Updated Vallejo, California

I assume you mean an editor on a video game news/blog site. It just so happens I was an editor for various sites, covering local and national news and subjects (USA).


There are two big challenges that I see:

  1. creating a network—writing can be a very singular experience and doesn't lend to being social. But you do need to flex those social skills to build your network of contacts. At E3 and a bunch of local events, I would meet a lot of video game marketers, project managers, developers, and PR pros. These are the people who will give you the information you need to write about game news, features, events, etc. These are also the people who will ignore you if you don't have a good relationship with them.
  2. maintaining integrity—read enough video game blogs, you start to see a pattern of announcements, reviews, previews, click-bait, etc. If you write the same thing as everyone else, you're not going to grow and build your individual brand and following. I for one was very interested in new trends. For example, when Disney acquired Playdom, it was an indication that mobile and social network games were here to stay. A company as big as Disney is averse to risk and so they won't make an investment in such an acquisition unless they saw this trend, which was very new and bleeding edge at the time, was a long-term thing. That was my POV when I wrote about the acquisition. NO ONE ELSE really cared so you hardly saw anyone else writing about it. They were stuck talking about games themselves, click-baity stuff like this dev said this, and that leader said that. Personally, it gave me satisfaction that I was putting forth a unique voice in a saturated market. It also got me promoted to the national video game news and reviews beat for the site I was writing for at the time.

Francisco recommends the following next steps:

  • Read through as many blogs as you can to see what's out there, what's bad writing, and what's good.
  • I use Feedly to aggregate video game sites myself.