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What does a regular day look like for a computer scientist that works on video games?

Im doing a school project and i need some information. #computer-science #computer #computer-engineering #video-games #computers

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Peter’s Answer

video gaming in profession world is quite different than what people usually play. the gaming world usually model around picking a gaming engine (role playing, maze, strategic...) and a rendering engine (how it display and show up). there is a lot of 3D-math in rendering an object in real time and there algorithm-math in a maze game. in my view of a "computer scientist" perspective, the data rendering to a meaningful way is quite important, e.g. how does corona virus work or spread? It is not what you call traditional gaming but it is a game in the computer world. Hope that help.
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Frank’s Answer

Its a team effort. So in addition to the designing, coding and testing, you'll spend significant time meeting with other team members and clients. You discuss a broad range of topics such as requirements, design and how your portion of the code will interact with code that others may be developing. Therefore interpersonal and communication skills are also required. At times you'll work as a team and at other times you'll work independently so you will need to be comfortable operating in both scenarios. This all has to be coordinated and more often than not, there is a project manager role that will orchestrate the work that needs to be done.
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Daniela’s Answer

Hi Sam,


At the most basic level, programmers write the code that makes things happen in a video game. This includes connecting or "mapping" the player input from the control pad to the action that's happening on the screen. It also includes all the action or movement of non-player characters; for instance, when you see NPCs wandering the terrain of a video game, it's the programmers who gave the characters the artificial intelligence to roam where they do.
In related industries, the equivalent position to game programmer is usually a software developer or software programmer. Some programmers, depending on their title, might code something other than the game, such as the proprietary (or homemade) tools used to build the game or the networking architecture behind the game.


Programmers work closely with artists, designers, producers, testers, sound designers, and everyone else who has a hands-on role making the game, supporting them when they need more technical know-how to complete their tasks.


Programmers are math and science people, and more specifically, algebra, calculus, and computer science people. Typically, programmers hold a degree in (or have advanced knowledge of) computer science.
Before programmers find work in the game industry, they need to have a firm and working grasp of a programming language, usually C++, though many also need to know Assembly, C, or Java.


C++ is the most common language used in the game industry today. More and more programmers are also becoming versed in scripting languages (sometimes used to script gameplay, but not usually the backbone code of the game at large), such as Perl, Lua, Ruby, or Python. A person who is interested in becoming a programmer should be able to define the terms SDK, API, object-oriented language (and if you don't know them, be ready to look them up now).


Programmers must be able to seek out the answers to questions they have and the solutions to problems they face. In this sense, programmers must be strong independent learners.


However, it's crucial that game programmers also know how to communicate effectively with others, as their jobs require that they share their knowledge on an everyday basis. This sentiment, unfortunately, is contrary to the stereotypical reclusive programmer of yore. Game programmers absolutely cannot keep to themselves, especially when working on large console games, as they must interact constantly with other team members. Having a lot of patience and a friendly disposition goes a long way.


In: http://www.gamecareerguide.com/features/412/game_programming_an_introduction.php


Best of luck!

Thank you comment icon thanks for your help sam
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