2 answers

What are some good jobs for RFID work?

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2
100% of 2 Pros

2 answers

Brennan’s Answer

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It sounds like you want to work on the chips themselves, which would be hardware electrical engineering. For programming, you're looking for embedded software engineer or systems engineer, as it's closer down near the chip.

Brennan recommends the following next steps:

  • Decide what level of programming you want to be doing. Hardware (Electrical, probably using C), or embedded software (a little further removed, probably C++)
  • Use LinkedIn to find jobs in your area matching those job descriptions
  • Research the companies by reading Glassdoor and connecting with employees of the company on LinkedIn
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Shyam’s Answer

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Hi John,

First, I want to make sure that we have the same idea, so that I don't go off ranting into a tangent.

In my understanding, an RFID (radio frequency identification) engineer handles developing and implementing a organization's system to track goods and information via wireless chips. Industries where RFID engineers are needed range from retail to health care to pharmaceuticals, according to an emiment, partner and co-leader of the technology practice in the Americas for executive search firm Battalia Winston International, demand for these hires will grow as more businesses adopt RFID. A 2007 survey by CompTIA found that more than two-thirds of organizations surveyed believe there is an insufficient pool of RFID talent from which to hire. RFID is "coming into vogue in the future, without doubt,".

However fast-forward to 2019, and the major areas you're going to be looking at are

  1. Hardware oriented : Electronics engineering or hardware electrical engineers
  2. System engineering or Embedded systems software development / VLSI

Applications for tracking technology are limitless, and more uses for RFID will be developed as chip prices decrease and standards are introduced, according to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. However, the technology's newness means that a company's level of RFID use will determine the depth of the role and the type of hire needed. Firms with a more established program will need employees who can help maintain the system. Companies with limited or no RFID experience may require someone to build all aspects of a system.

Desired skills: An electrical engineering degree from a major technical institution (think MIT; Carnegie Mellon; University of California, Berkeley; or Georgia Tech). Industry experience using RFID is a definite plus. In a retail environment, ERP, CRM, distribution and supply chain management experience strengthen candidates. An understanding of security doesn't hurt either, since RFID tags may hold sensitive data.


Shyam recommends the following next steps:

  • How to find job openings and mentors for guidance: RFID engineers are usually buried in an organization, which makes finding one difficult. Try looking for leads in industry journals and at conferences, which offer the opportunity to network for possible candidates as well as the ability to research potential hires.
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