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What is your weekly schedule like?


4 on 3 off at the airlines Tony Cortopassi

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Scott’s Answer

Aviation, specifically dealing with airlines, is all about seniority; the more seniority you have, the better your schedule is/closer to what you want it to be. Everyone has different priorities on what determines their schedule (single, married, kids/no kids, family, etc.)

My personal schedule is I'm typically on 3-5 days at a time, be then off 2-5 days at a time. When I'm at work "on a trip," I'm gone from home, spending nights in a hotel. When I'm off work, it's exactly that, I'm OFF! There's no bringing work home or having your boss calling you trying to get you to pick up an extra shift or anything like that.

The beautiful part about being a pilot is that you can live almost anywhere and work for almost anyone/anywhere. If you don't live near the airport at which you are based at, you commute to work by flying to your base airport.

I hope that answers your question! Feel free to ask anymore you may have!

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Roy’s Answer

The answer is determined by the specific job you have within the aviation industry. A Commercial Pilot can work in vastly different jobs within the industry. To answer your question completely, you would need to be a little more specific on which "Commercial Pilot" job you are referring to. But, the short answer is if you are a pilot for the airline industry, you usually have a definitive schedule where you work a set number of days and then are off a set number of days. If you are a pilot for a corporation or a private company, your schedule could range from a set number of days on and off to being "on call" 24/7/365. If you are a pilot for an on demand charter operation, you possibly could see a combination of a set schedule or an on call type schedule. My experience with the industry has been that early in your career, you will spend more days flying weekends and holidays and/or otherwise days most 9-5ers are not working. Many jobs in this industry are based on seniority, meaning if you are low seniority, you will probably be flying a less than desirable schedule than someone with high seniority. Quality of life and work life balance are issues that many in the aviation industry face especially early in their career. Fortunately, most operations these days have duty time restrictions or protections in place that will afford you needed downtime/off time/family time. The key here is to choose your career direction and your future employers wisely. If you choose Aviation as a career, there are many social media sites you can join to help you decide which employers are the most desirable. Hope this helps....

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Roy’s Answer

The answer is determined by the specific job you have within the aviation industry. A Commercial Pilot can work in vastly different jobs within the industry. To answer your question completely, you would need to be a little more specific on which "Commercial Pilot" job you are referring to. But, the short answer is if you are a pilot for the airline industry, you usually have a definitive schedule where you work a set number of days and then are off a set number of days. If you are a pilot for a corporation or a private company, your schedule could range from a set number of days on and off to being "on call" 24/7/365. If you are a pilot for an on demand charter operation, you possibly could see a combination of a set schedule or an on call type schedule. My experience with the industry has been that early in your career, you will spend more days flying weekends and holidays and/or otherwise days most 9-5ers are not working. Many jobs in this industry are based on seniority, meaning if you are low seniority, you will probably be flying a less than desirable schedule than someone with high seniority. Quality of life and work life balance are issues that many in the aviation industry face especially early in their career. Fortunately, most operations these days have duty time restrictions or protections in place that will afford you needed downtime/off time/family time. The key here is to choose your career direction and your future employers wisely. If you choose Aviation as a career, there are many social media sites you can join to help you decide which employers are the most desirable. Hope this helps....

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Jenny’s Answer

I work in sales and my office schedule is normally 9-6 unless I'm travelling overseas to visit clients (normally once a month business trip). When in the office I focus on emails in the mornings then calls in the afternoon, with clearly defined daily activity targets. Depending on my calendar, internal/external meetings/calls are scheduled in as well.
When on business trips, I normally try to do 3 customer/prospec meetings a day, and on occasion, lunch/dinner with customers. Some business trips are for marketing events/conferences etc to meet prospects.

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Alan’s Answer

My schedule varies but normally I will work 3 or 4 days in a row and have 2 days off. I get to bid for my schedule the month prior and based on my seniority will determine how much of my schedule I get. The more senior you are the more say you have in your schedule. It is very easy for me to take time off for vacation or travel.

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Alan’s Answer

My schedule varies but normally I will work 3 or 4 days in a row and have 2 days off. I get to bid for my schedule the month prior and based on my seniority will determine how much of my schedule I get. The more senior you are the more say you have in your schedule. It is very easy for me to take time off for vacation or travel.

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Michael’s Answer

It’s all depends where you work. Typically it’s about 4 days on 3 off. Some places have an on-call policy or a 2 week on 2 week off schedule.

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Ken’s Answer

As an airline pilot, my schedule was determined based on my schedule bid selection made the month prior. With such a choice, I often bid based on the cities I wanted to visit, or the type of flights I wanted to do, or the days off I needed from work. For example, if I wanted to visit a friend or relative who lived in another city or country, I would bid for flights that had layovers nearby. Or, during the summer when I attend auto racing events, I would bid for long weekends of three or four days off from Thursday to Sunday.

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Stephen’s Answer

I work a 5 days on, 2 days off, 5 days on, 3 days off roster pattern with leave/holidays.

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