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What is the most rewarding about being a nurse?


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Joseph’s Answer

For me I truly love helping the elderly. Currently working as home health nurse and get to see there heart. I do lots of teaching most of my patient are heart patients. I teach them how tom manage IV therapy at home, Implantable Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Placement. Teach them to manage there medications, what they are and why they are needed. I also help them understand there health condition and how they can manage it, with medication but mostly with eating better and doing age appropriate exercise. I also see them in there environment and she how they live. I have picked up some information over the years and can play baby social worker too.

I am working with a 87 year old male. He had a major heart attack almost two years ago. He came to me on an IV and Life vest (portable defibulator). His EF was 5%, normal is 55-75% and was not expected to live. But he has lost 45 lbs., he goes to the YMCA 5 days a week and eats better. He was able to get his pacemaker and last echo showed his EF was 15-20%. He is also loving life again.


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Richard’s Answer

Nursing is a great career. They have an opportunity to make an impact on the lives of patients during their most vulnerable times in their lives. After obtaining a nursing degree, there are so many pathways open to nurses: jobs in hospitals or clinics, working with critically ill patients or providing preventative care for healthy people, working in procedure oriented specialties such as surgery or cardiology, management or clinical medicine, even pursuing advanced degrees such as becoming a nurse practitioner or CRNA.

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Darleana’s Answer

Knowing that you could help someone at their lowest point. Sometimes you are the only person that patient has.
Seeing a patient make strides towards progress.
Being there when a patient is dying and scared so they don't die alone.
Knowing that what you do matters if not for you for someone else.

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