7 answers

how did you begin your career? and at what age?

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100% of 7 Pros

7 answers

Michael’s Answer

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I believe you start your career way early in life, before you even decide what you want to do. You do this by volunteering and/or having entry level jobs where you learn basic skills about responsibility, working with others, doing what's right and/or you believe in, and time management. These are all skills that are basic that you will use down the road when you finally find what career you really want.

BTW: I also agree with Bettye's answer as you may have multiple "careers" over your working lifetime.
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Katya’s Answer

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Hi Yaneli, I have began my career at the age of 22 after I have graduating college with my bachelor degree.

It wasn’t an easy process and of course I was getting tons of denials from the recruiters but I wasn’t going to give up. Realizing that after graduating college I wasn’t going to make top dollars and jump directly into my office with a big comfy chair was step one. So, I started from the very bottom in retail- and worked my way up.

Of course, the road wasn’t an easy one and as an immigrant I was getting many and consistent push back. 20 years ago- companies didn’t pay much attention to how you felt and your management team was leading the way they preferred. I had a lot of head bumps with upper management because I always demanding respect and to be treated with respect and the level of the seniority didn’t really matter to me because I knew that one day I will be in their role or higher.

I honestly work hard and I continue to do so-even though I know that you should be disconnecting from work and that work shouldn’t become your everything but when you love what you are doing, when I have passion and that’s just how I am-my work ethics are very strong and of course I demand the same from everyone.

Now I look back and I think I probably couldn’t made a different route and the truth is I still can- no age, no one, no discouragement should ever stop you from following your dream.

I had times when I cried, and absolutely hated my job-so I looked for another one and remember you are in control of whatever it is you doing. Regardless of your title always expect to be treated right and if someone is not treating you-make sure you call it a meeting or a discussion and share your feelings. From the experience, the relationship tends to get better and people begin to understand why you felt a certain way. Don’t be afraid- the road to success is a difficult one but ones you find mentors and meet people that truly want to invest in you-you will find a way to love what you do.

Good luck
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Bettye’s Answer

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Actually I was 40 years old when I became a Licensed Professional Counselor. I was a college administrator who was given the opportunity to return to college to complete my graduate degree join the faculty as a counselor/professor. There was a dearth of Counseling professionals to accommodate our 20k student population, so I welcomed the challenge. It has proven to be a very rewarding career choice!

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Dick’s Answer

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My software engineering career education "officially" started in High School with a couple of programming classes. However, my interest in computers began back in my elementary school days where the school I attended had a program where all 4th and 5th grade students got a computer to take home and we were required to do our homework on them. This was in the early days of the public internet and everything about computers, computer games, the internet interested me. I always wanted to know how they worked and how the games or software I used was built. In high school I finally got that start and then went into studying computer science as my college major.

I came out of college when the software industry was still recovering from the .com bust of the early 2000's. I got my first real software job working a very small local startup that was focused on revolutionizing the propane tank exchange industry. After a couple of years in that role and not a ton of forward momentum, I made a jump to larger more establish software specific company really began growing my skillset and experience from there.

In looking back the key for me was getting a foot in the door somewhere and then always looking at where I was headed and whether that was the direction I wanted to be going. If it wasn't, then I'd look to make a change to what did align with my goals.

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Steven’s Answer

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Hi Yaneli,

My very first job experience was as a freshman in high school as a Soccer Referee, which I continued throughout my high school and college career. Looking back on that experience, the biggest advantages of working throughout high school was that it allowed me to supplement my SAT scores & grades with tangible work experience on my college applications.

Transitioning into my professional career, I completed my first internship at the age of 22, at a telecommunications company in Medellín, Colombia. This was an excellent introduction into the professional workforce, in addition to the abroad experience which employers also value. (If you're currently in college and interested in abroad/exchange opportunities, see if your campus has an AIESEC chapter which offers opportunities to work abroad over the summer).

If I were to do it all over again, I would have more aggressively searched to complete a professional internship over the summer after my sophomore and junior years. I can't stress enough how important it is to find any summer internship opportunities that you can highlight on your resume and showcase to employers as you're graduating from college.

After returning from my abroad experience, I decided to transition into the tech industry and landed a full-time position at the age of 24.

To conclude with some reflections/advice, it's never too early to gain work/volunteer experience that, in addition to being an enriching personal experience, can be used to strengthen your prospects for landing a career, or getting into college.


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Josh’s Answer

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I began my career at age 16. I knew by then I wanted to work in the computer field, ideally programming, so I got part time work as an assistant to an IT consultant. He had me do all the gross jobs (like getting down into dusty crawl crawl spaces to pull cables) but he also taught me a lot about computer systems along the way as well. In college I was able to reference that experience to get an IT job on campus as well, so I was studying computer science theory, and in between helping build networks and servers in a very practical way.

If you can do it, it's great to find entry level work in the field you're interested, even if you're still in school. You might find that the career isn't what you imagined it to be as well, and be able to change direction before investing too much of your education in a certain direction.

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Riya’s Answer

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While most of the graduation courses prepare you with generic knowledge, courses after graduation help you specialise and channelize your knowledge and efforts to make it big in your career. The ITM University offers a vast range of courses in different fields. Experts train candidates to work for the present industry.
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