13 answers
Asked Viewed 272 times Translate

Should I follow my passions or go towards following what will help me make a living?

I want to be a photographer or an architect but from what people keep telling me is that they don't make enough money, what should I do, what will truly benefit me? #architect #architecture #photography


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
12
100% of 11 Pros
100% of 1 Students

13 answers


Updated Translate

Alexandra (Sasha)’s Answer

I have a son about to go to college and we've been having the same discussions with him. Your job is where you will spend the better part of your waking hours, so it's important that you like it (or love it) at least sometimes. So don't pick anything you hate. But pick something practical, because if you are doing something you love and it doesn't pay the bills, and you are often stressed about how to make ends meet, that job you are so passionate about won't alleviate the stress. Find a way, perhaps to incorporate your passions into a side thing, or something you do outside of work. Also, keep in mind that happiness is a combination of everything in your life, including where you live, your family and friends, time and ability to pursue the things you enjoy - sports, travel, hobbies, etc. A job you like well enough, combined with general satisfaction in these other areas, will lead to a contented life. Hopefully. Good luck.


3
100% of 1 Pros
100% of 2 Students
Updated Translate

Josh’s Answer

This is a tough question that I think many of us grapple with.

First, that advice might be worth double checking on. Based on some light research, the national averages for a photographer's salary are around $45k, and for architects it's more like $80-100k, depending on your source. They are both pretty reasonably paid positions.

Life is short, and if you can spend it doing something that you're passionate about and get paid for it at the same time, that's amazing.

Of course, every job has bad days or bad periods, if you're an architect but your boss or clients are awful, it's probably going to be hard to feel the passion, even if the work itself would otherwise be a blast.

There's also a question of how much money you really need. A life spent doing things that don't feel like work is it's own form of payment, and if you've got food and shelter, maybe that's enough! But if your dreams are of doing work you're passionate about and being wealthy, that becomes a harder target to hit.

A passion for photography and design can be a great asset for many kinds of jobs that are more commercially viable as well, so that might be another angle to explore.


3
100% of 1 Pros
100% of 2 Students
Updated Translate

Capria’s Answer

Jaime,

I dealt with a similar dilemma when I was going to school. I fell in love with photography but was going to school for biology with the thoughts of becoming a doctor. However I found that my heart just wasn't in biology. Photography is something I began to practice and eventually turned it into a small business. I changed my studies in school to align more with what I loved to do. I ended up majoring in multimedia mass communications which is a combination degree of journalism, pr, marketing, graphic design and photography. By doing this I opened up a ton of doors in the work world while still being able to hone in on the thing that I loved to do. I currently work for Verizon and am working toward getting into the marketing department of the business. However in my free time and on days off I still am an active photographer running my own small business but continuing to grow it nevertheless. Don't let working in one field deter you from chasing your other dreams.

Capria

Capria recommends the following next steps:

Shadow a photographer or architect
Shadow someone in another field you may be interested in
Keep your interests as a hobby

0
Updated Translate

Florent’s Answer

I started as a Microbiology technician, I thought it will be my passion for my living but after a year working as a technician I found out that what really interested me was management and technology on a day to day basis. My first passions where not the one I should do for a living, I still do Microbiology studies and research for my hobby but my everyday enjoyment is apassion that I didn't know when I started to work. My advice would be follow your passions without hesitating to change as much as needed to wake up everyday happy to go to work.


0
Updated Translate

Nicole’s Answer

I am of the belief that you following your passions will always motivate you to do more which can eventually lead in a lucrative income. Get innovative with what you are already good at - if you like photography, look at some of the highest generating aspects of the business like wedding photography. Once you have a portfolio established, you can give teach classes for editing and photography or even sell prints. Same goes for architecture - the construction management side of the business is often higher revenue generating and there are other opportunities to earn income in addition to your day job.

0
Updated Translate

Florent’s Answer

I started as a Microbiology technician, I thought it will be my passion for my living but after a year working as a technician I found out that what really interested me was management and technology on a day to day basis. My first passions were not the one I should do for a living, I still do Microbiology studies and research for my hobby but my everyday enjoyment is a passion that I didn't know when I started to work. My advice would be follow your passions without hesitating to change as much as needed to wake up everyday happy to go to work.


0
Updated Translate

Carla’s Answer

First of all, looking up the national average salary won't do you much good. You have to find out what that job pays in your state. The exact same job working in New York or California will make you twice as much money as if you lived in Georgia or Alabama. However the cost of living in NY and CA is a lot higher than it is in the deep south so you may have more disposable income even if you made a lower salary.

Second, no matter where you live, an architect will make a hell of a lot more money than a photographer, if you could even find a job as a photographer.

If you decide to study art/photography in college you will likely hear the phrase around campus, "what does the liberal arts major say?...answer -"You want fries with that? "

0
Updated Translate

Boopathy’s Answer

In my opinion, first build your financial state stronger, in the early 10 years of your career earn money as much as possible so that money should not impact your future and then follow your passions which really interests you as your passion might change when you are matured. When you become mature you will take right decision which is relevant to you.

0
Updated Translate

Carol’s Answer

Hi Jaime!! You need to be happy and love what you do. I think you can find something that fits both categories which would help you go along. You may start out in a position where you don't want to be for the rest of your life and that's OK.. We all have to work hard to get where we want to go. Set goals for yourself and I'm sure you will be successful!

0
Updated Translate

James’s Answer

At the end of the day follow your dreams and what makes you happy. Everything else will fall into place from that - we only have one life and we need to make sure we are doing what we enjoy and be in the moment and enjoy it! Good luck! :)

0
Updated Translate

Florent’s Answer

MyI started as a Microbiology technician, I thought it will be my passion for my living but after a year working as a technician I found out that what really interested me was management and technology on a day to day basis. My first passions where not the one I should do for a living, I still do Microbiology studies and research for my hobby but my everyday enjoyment is apassion that I didn't know when I started to work.



0
Updated Translate

Ashutosh’s Answer

Hi Jaime, Earn living is not a big deal even small aunt is doing the same in his own way. The only difference is that we can earn this living consciously, we can choose our own passion which bring success and happiness both.

0
Updated Translate

Scott’s Answer

Follow your passions when determining your career path. If you do something that you love, your job will never feel like work! Be creative and think broadly to find how your passion can provide you financial success. Sometimes there is a balance between completely following your passion and finding the right job to gain your financial success.



0