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Is it bad that I applied to only one university?

I've known which school I wanted to go to for forever, but I still feel a little guilty not applying anywhere else. I get all this mail and I'm like, "Sorry, you never had a chance." #college #college-applications


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Kate’s Answer

This is absolutely NOT a "bad" thing. However, I would say it is taking a chance. I do not know your academic history, the school you're applying to, or anything of the sort, but there is a chance for anyone to get rejected from their dream school. I knew which university I wanted to attend from the second I heard a representative pitch it to me my sophomore year of high school. This did not stop me from touring my parent's alma mater and applying to that one as well. One of my own personal mottos is "better safe than sorry!" Again, there is absolutely nothing "bad" about applying to one. I know several who only applied to one without any worries! I do encourage applying to a second, a Plan B school, JUST in case. If you have no doubt in your mind you will be accepted to your dream school, then I wouldn't worry too hard about it. As long as you feel comfortable in your decision, that's all that matters.

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Kayla’s Answer

If you've already been accepted or you know you will be accepted then no! Applications can be expensive and you shouldn't waste money or time if you have your mind made up.

The one thing you could be missing out on is different scholarship opportunities. Personally I thought I knew where I wanted to go until another school offered me much more money and that ended up changing my mind. But if this is not a factor to you then the one application is all you need.

If you think there's a chance you might not get in you can always apply to a back up school ahead of time in case you don't find out about the school you want until after application deadlines have passed.


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Troy’s Answer

I have an 18 year old daughter graduating from high school in a few weeks, she felt the same way. As parents we forced her to apply to multiple universities. At any age you typically don't know as much as you think you do, but the younger you are the more you don't know what you don't know. So it's easy to make false assumptions regarding what you think you want or what you think your sure of, that's normal.


We learned first hand it can be expensive to apply to a lot of schools. If that's an obstacle, at least watch some youtube videos on a few alternate schools, best case talk to the recruiters. You may be surprised at how easily your mind is changed, or you may confirm your original choice. Either way your better off making an informed decision.


Also, you may want to try for a higher ranked school for fun, or submit an app for a plan B if your first choice isn't a sure thing. If you can afford the application fees, apply to as many as possible. Ideally, after talking to friends that have some insight on which schools are most likely to offer you a scholarship.


Ask yourself what you gain by not exploring more options...


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Ryan’s Answer

It is safer to apply to multiple universities. Most people apply to their aspirational schools, the schools they think they'll get into, and some "backup" schools. Once you've got a list of acceptance letters and schools to choose from, you can visit them. You never know, the school you thought you didn't want to attend, may be the one you end up wanting to go to. And the one you've had your heart set on going to, might not be the best one.


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Rachel’s Answer

This is not a bad decision. It is simply your decision. That said, if you live somewhere that doesn't offer automatic admission to the one place you applied to, and you have not been automatically accepted, then you are risking not getting into college.

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