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Is there one route that is better than another to get into law school?

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I am super curious about multiple "potential careers", one of them being law. I am starting university in the fall of 2020, and am wondering if there is particular undergraduate degrees that are more effective when entering a law program. #law-school #law #college #lawyer # attorney

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Jorie’s Answer

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You certainly do not need to major in a particular subject in order to go to law school (I graduated with people who majored in everything from English Lit to Biology!) but there are majors that may be more useful. If your school has a pre-law major that would be best. If your school does not have a pre-law major then I suggest majoring in philosophy or political science. I went to a school that did not have a pre-law major but had a tri-part major that they recommended for people considering law school. It focused on political science, philosophy, and economics. I found those courses to be really helpful because I went into law school already knowing how to interpret and summarize case law, which will make up a good portion of your law school education.
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Charles (Chuck)’s Answer

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There is no undergraduate degree that's better than another before attending law school. In my law school class we had education majors, philosophy, engineering, and even a licensed physician (why you'd do that, is beyond me, but he did). There are some areas of law such as Intellectual Property that actually benefit from having an engineering degree, but that's not engraved in stone anywhere either. The key is to do well in whatever major you take on. Your grades matter to the law school admissions people. I would not go pre-law myself because if you get such a degree and decide you don't want to go to law school, you're stuck. I'd also advise anyone desiring to apply to law school to take the LSAT Prep Classes prior to taking the LSAT. Unlike the SAT, they average your scores rather than taking the best one (at least that's what they did 20 years ago). There are "tricks" to the LSAT that you will want to learn BEFORE taking it. I took it without, then took it again after the class. I improved my score 15 points. Good Luck!
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Sarah’s Answer

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Hannah,

I am currently in my third year of law school and I was a Business and Economics major. My suggestion is to do pursue a major in whatever you are interested in and in whatever classes you can excel at because grades are typically very important for the law school admission process.

Further, the field of law welcomes many diverse backgrounds. If you have a background that is different than others in your law school classes it will be appreciated. Further, you may be able to offer unique perspectives and insight which will all be valuable for a career in law.
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Aram’s Answer

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I think the best route is to work in the field first to get an idea what your life might be like. You can work as a legal assistant of paralegal and then you can see close up what the work consists of. Law schools also look for diverse backgrounds so have a year or two of actual experience will separate you from the field. Lastly, if you go into law school knowing what you would like your specialty to be you will have a leg up on your classmates and your job search will be easier. What I hear most from my colleagues that are unhappy is that they had no idea what they were getting into.
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